Economics : Goats and Soda Economics
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Economics

Workers from the garment sector block a road during a protest to demand payment of due wages, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April 2020. They claimed that factories had not paid them after retailers and brands cancelled orders due to worldwide lockdown measures. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP via Getty Images

Modu Churi, who fled his village to escape the militant Boko Haram group last year, now earns a living by charging cellphones for displaced persons in northeastern Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

How To Succeed In Business After Fleeing For Your Life

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Countries that received the most remittance dollars from the U.S. in 2015 Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

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Brittany Mayes/NPR

A Proposed New Tax, Mainly On Latinos, To Pay For Trump's Border Wall

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A girl in a park in Managua, Nicaragua. The country topped the list for gains in happiness. Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Global Ranking Of Happiness Has Happy News For Norway And Nicaragua

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In a live TV program, John Macharia tells the Kenyan president that traffic police in Nairobi expect bribes from matatu drivers. iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR

Kenyan Bus Driver Speaks Out Against Everyday Corruption On Live TV

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A worker stands in a construction project in a favela, or shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The government has helped drive down income inequality by investing in basic services like health care, education and pensions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images