Infectious Disease : Goats and Soda Infectious Disease

This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802. Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Viruses thrive in the security lines at airports, according to several studies. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Where Are The Most Viruses In An Airport? Hint: It's Probably Not The Toilet

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Girls at the St. John's Community Centre in Nairobi, Kenya, attend an event supported by PEPFAR, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Praise For The Global HIV Program That Trump Wants To Cut

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A Pakistani health worker administers the oral polio vaccine to a child during a campaign in Karachi on May 7. Because of past attacks on vaccinators, security personnel are often assigned to accompany them. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Wipe Out Polio In Pakistan

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This red blood cell is swollen by the malaria parasite. In this image from a transmission electron micrograph, the blood cell has been colored red and the single-cell malaria parasite has been colored green. Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

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On May 13, people suspected of having the Ebola virus wait at a treatment center in the village of Bikoro, where the outbreak began in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. John Bompengo/AP hide caption

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John Bompengo/AP

Ebola Outbreak: How Worried Should We Be?

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Dario Garcia, who lives in Panama, volunteers to visit people who are HIV-positive to see whether they are taking their medications. Garcia himself is HIV-positive. "I feel alone," he says. "I believe the most support I have now is from others who have been diagnosed." Jacob McCleland for NPR hide caption

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Jacob McCleland for NPR

What's Behind The Alarming Spike In HIV Infections In Panama?

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Patients are treated at an Army ward in Kansas during the influenza epidemic of 1918. About 675,000 Americans died of the flu known as "la grippe." NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images

A mosquito's antenna responds to odors. Scientists are trying to figure out how the malaria parasite might trigger a change in body odor that draws in mosquitoes that carry the disease, like the Anopheles skeeter pictured above. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

By mid-January, there had been nearly 5,000 reported cases of diphtheria in the camps and 33 deaths. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Rare Disease Finds Fertile Ground In Rohingya Refugee Camps

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Researchers are working on a new way to deliver anti-HIV drugs. A six-pointed device (artist's rendering, above) folds up to fit inside a capsule. One swallowed, the capsule dissolves and the device opens up and slowly dispenses the medication. Partners Healthcare / Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Partners Healthcare / Screenshot by NPR

A girl is vaccinated against dengue as part of a public immunization program for children in the Philippines. The program was suspended after the company raised safety concerns about the vaccination. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images