Infectious Disease : Goats and Soda Infectious Disease

Rat traps are a weapon behind used to fight the plague in Madagascar, since the rodents carry the disease. But getting rid of all the rats would be difficult — and without rats, plague-infected fleas could then turn to humans for a blood meal. RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RIJASOLO/AFP/Getty Images

Workers spray to kill fleas in a public school in Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital. A bite from an infected flea can spread the plague, which has stricken 157 people in the island nation since August. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Twins Heloisa (left) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, had a one-year birthday party on April 16 in Areia, Brazil. Their mother says she contracted the Zika virus during pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

How Zika Became So Dangerous For Babies

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Maria Carolina Silva Flor and Joselito Alves dos Santos with their 18-month-old daughter, Maria Gabriela Silva Alves. The baby was born with Zika syndrome. Amanda Klasing hide caption

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Amanda Klasing

Nurses give the oral polio vaccine to a Syrian child in a refugee camp in Turkey. The oral polio vaccine used throughout most of the developing world contains a form of the virus that has been weakened in the laboratory. But it's still a live virus. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images
Matt Twombly for NPR

Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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Dr. Thumbi Mwangi, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Kenya, at Howard Theatre in Washington, DC, on Nov. 29, 2016. In the U.S., Mwangi worked on a vaccine for cows that aimed to combat the same disease he saw the bovine battle in Kenya as a kid. Akash Ghai/for NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/for NPR

Fishermen in Papua New Guinea, living on their boats, wait for the tide to change before going out to fish. Tuberculosis is a major health threat in the Pacific Ocean nation. Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

A shop owner holds a live chicken for sale in a Hong Kong market. Isaac Lawrence /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Lawrence /AFP/Getty Images

Why Chinese Scientists Are More Worried Than Ever About Bird Flu

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