Aid : Goats and Soda Aid
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Aid

Joel Charny, who's been a humanitarian aid worker for 40 years, talks to students at a camp for internally displaced people in northern Sri Lanka in 2005. It's one of his favorite photos, he says, "because this is what I did hundreds of times: interview people about what they were going through and what they needed for their lives to improve." Courtesy of Joel Charny hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Charny

An Afghan woman feeds a newborn rescued and brought to Ataturk National Children's Hospital in Kabul in May 2020 after gunmen attacked a maternity ward operated by Doctors Without Borders. The nonprofit runs clinics and hospitals in parts of the country — and is continuing its work following the Taliban takeover. Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Health workers arrive in a tuk-tuk to administer doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to elderly citizens in their homes in Lima, Peru, in April. Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

From Money To Monsoons: Obstacles Loom For Countries Awaiting Vaccine Doses

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From left: Home cooked food at Srabasti Ghosh's home, ready for delivery. A volunteer delivers food to COVID-19 patients outside their home. Ghosh (right) with a friend who has joined to help. Srabasti Ghosh hide caption

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Srabasti Ghosh

An N95 respirator — a critical piece of personal protective equipment. The U.S. is now restricting the ability of aid groups abroad to use American funds to buy PPE. Xinzheng/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinzheng/Getty Images

Mark Green has stepped down as administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) after nearly three years on the job. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Exiting USAID Chief On The Pandemic, Foreign Aid, Trump's Policies

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Medical workers transfer a patient from the Doctors Without Borders cholera treatment unit to the intensive care unit at the general hospital in Masisi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Alexis Huget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Huget/AFP via Getty Images

Displaced Kurdish and Arab women, who fled from violence after a Turkish offensive in northeastern Syria, sit with their children at a public school used as shelter where they now live in Hasakah, Syria. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters

Corn from a fall harvest in Guatemala. John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images hide caption

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John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images

In Guatemala, A Bad Year For Corn — And For U.S. Aid

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With a mobile phone, Kenyans can send and receive money via a service called M-PESA. Now Facebook is entering the digital currency realm. The social media giant has helped develop a digital currency called Libra that plans to launch in 2020. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

Kanye West wore a Balenciaga shirt with the World Food Programme's logo on it while visiting an orphanage near Kampala, Uganda, in October 2018. On this trip, he gifted bags full of his $220 Yeezy sneakers to the children. Stringer /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer /AFP/Getty Images

Employees peek through the door of a showroom at a food factory in Pyongyang, North Korea. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

Why South Korea Is Sending $8 Million In Food Aid To North Korea

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Sally Deng for NPR

Why This Charity Isn't Afraid To Say It Failed

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