Aid : Goats and Soda Aid
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Aid

Iraqis displaced from the city of Fallujah collect aid distributed by the Norwegian Refugee Council, which has been awarded this year's $2.5 million Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images

Sir Mark Lowcock, the former head of the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, has written a memoir, Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times. In 2017, he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath for his work in international development. Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images

People line up to get the Sinopharm vaccine in Harare, Zimbabwe. World leaders promised to speed up vaccine distribution to low- and middle-income countries at the White House's second Global COVID-19 Summit on May 12. Tafadzwa Ufumeli/Getty Images hide caption

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Tafadzwa Ufumeli/Getty Images

People line up to receive a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine dose during a mass vaccination campaign in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in August 2021. Issouf Sanogo/Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/Getty Images

Why this USAID official is optimistic the U.S. can get the world vaccinated

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Roqia Qasqari, 47, who lives in Gero village in Afghanistan's Bamyan Province, has a stockpile of potatoes from an earlier harvest. In 2021, her province and others experienced severe drought, jeopardizing the food supply. Hunger will continue to be an issue in Afghanistan and around the globe in 2022, especially for communities dealing with overlapping crises. Stefani Glinski/The New Humanitarian hide caption

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Stefani Glinski/The New Humanitarian

USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivered a speech on her "new vision" for the agency on Nov. 4 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Containers of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine doses, donated by the United States, arrive in Bogota, Colombia, in July. The U.S. plans to send more than a billion vaccines abroad by September 2022. Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images

What the U.S. can — and cannot — do for vaccine equity per the State Department

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Joel Charny, who's been a humanitarian aid worker for 40 years, talks to students at a camp for internally displaced people in northern Sri Lanka in 2005. It's one of his favorite photos, he says, "because this is what I did hundreds of times: interview people about what they were going through and what they needed for their lives to improve." Courtesy of Joel Charny hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Charny

An Afghan woman feeds a newborn rescued and brought to Ataturk National Children's Hospital in Kabul in May 2020 after gunmen attacked a maternity ward operated by Doctors Without Borders. The nonprofit runs clinics and hospitals in parts of the country — and is continuing its work following the Taliban takeover. Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Health workers arrive in a tuk-tuk to administer doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to elderly citizens in their homes in Lima, Peru, in April. Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

From Money To Monsoons: Obstacles Loom For Countries Awaiting Vaccine Doses

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From left: Home cooked food at Srabasti Ghosh's home, ready for delivery. A volunteer delivers food to COVID-19 patients outside their home. Ghosh (right) with a friend who has joined to help. Srabasti Ghosh hide caption

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Srabasti Ghosh

An N95 respirator — a critical piece of personal protective equipment. The U.S. is now restricting the ability of aid groups abroad to use American funds to buy PPE. Xinzheng/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinzheng/Getty Images

Mark Green has stepped down as administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) after nearly three years on the job. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Exiting USAID Chief On The Pandemic, Foreign Aid, Trump's Policies

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Medical workers transfer a patient from the Doctors Without Borders cholera treatment unit to the intensive care unit at the general hospital in Masisi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Alexis Huget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Huget/AFP via Getty Images