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STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

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A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

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The numerals in this illustration show the main mutation sites of the delta variant of the coronavirus, which is likely the most contagious version. Here, the virus's spike protein (red) binds to a receptor on a human cell (blue). Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source
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How To Get Your Kids To Do Chores (Without Resenting It)

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The Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility, dug in the mid-1960s, allows scientists a three-dimensional look at frozen ground. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

Is There A Ticking Time Bomb Under The Arctic?

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