Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

In July, workers in the restaurant, food and alcohol industry took part in a nationwide protest against South Africa's liquor ban and other lockdown measures. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

Why South Africa Banned Booze — And What Happened Next

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Medical first aid is actually not what we're focused on in this situation, says Ampara Vilasmil, a mental health activity manager for a camp set up by MSF in Montepuez. Most of the people that come to the camps are hungry and tired but physically fine. It's actually psychological first aid they need to help them deal with the trauma they've been through. Alfredo Zuniga/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anike Baptiste receives a dose of J&J from nurse Mokgadi Malebye at a Pretoria hospital last February. South Africa is one of the countries that announced a pause on the J&J vaccine while more research is done into potential blood clots that occurred in younger women after getting the vaccine. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Ezhil Arasi (left) and Ranjith Kumar. The pandemic kept her from her pregnancy checkups. Their baby was born with an intestinal blockage that required surgery and died during the procedure. Doctors told Ranjith that if his wife had been examined regularly during her pregnancy, there could have been a different outcome. Ranjith Kumar hide caption

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Ranjith Kumar

Mumbai's grand Keshavji Nayak fountain towers above the street and serves as a place of respite for thirsty passers-by. It's one of dozens of ornate fountains in the city, built during the British colonial era. Viraj Nayar for NPR hide caption

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Viraj Nayar for NPR

PHOTOS: Mumbai Falls In Love All Over Again With Its Forgotten Fountains

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The usual side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine can range from a sore arm to flu-like symptoms. Or, if you're lucky, you won't get any side effects at all. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

A scientist works on COVID-19 samples to find variations of the virus at the Croix-Rousse Hospital laboratory in Lyon, France, in January. Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images

Can Vaccines Stop Variants? Here's What We Know So Far

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The World Health Organization-approved proof of vaccination form is used these days for yellow fever. It's just a coincidence that the card itself is yellow. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Doviaza's maps overlay the daily number of COVID cases reported by the health ministry (depicted as the spike protein of the virus, shown in red) with locations of indigenous communities (dark green). Geoindigena/Rainforest Foundation hide caption

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Geoindigena/Rainforest Foundation

The award-winning documentary Writing with Fire follows Meera Devi (right), chief reporter for the Khabar Lahariya — a news publication run by Dalit, members of India's lowest caste. Black Ticket Films hide caption

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Black Ticket Films

When COVID-19 first broke out in Wuhan, scientists tracked a large number of the cases to the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan. Above: The Wuhan Hygiene Emergency Response Team departs the market on Jan. 11, 2020, after it had been shut down to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Some of our readers sent in their vaccine selfie pics. We asked the experts: What should they do with their vaccine cards? Photo collage by Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Photo collage by Michele Abercrombie/NPR

World Health Organization investigative team member Peter Daszak (shown here during a trip to China in February) tells NPR that the group's report calls for additional research on farms that breed exotic animals in southern China. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadawi received an honorary doctorate from the National Autonomus University of Mexico in 2010. The second of nine children born in a village just outside of Cairo, El Saadawi rejected patriarchy at a young age, stamping her feet in protest when her grandmother told her, "a boy is worth 15 girls at least ... girls are a blight." Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

The relatively empty flights of past months are filling up as more people get vaccinated — and make summer plans. Are there still risks to weigh? Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR