Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Hindu holy men sample the sacred waters, which are believed to be restorative, with the power to cleanse sin. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Welcome To The World's Largest Gathering Of Humans

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Members of Flambeaux — the evangelical Protestant scouting group — walk along a street in downtown Bangui, Central African Republic. Will Baxter hide caption

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Will Baxter

An image, from a scanning electron micrograph, of Heterorhabditis megidis nematode worms (colored blue). These parasitic worms harbor a bacteria that repels mosquitoes. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Sachets like these, developed to market consumer goods to the poor, have become ubiquitous all over Asia. Jes Aznar for NPR hide caption

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Jes Aznar for NPR

A New Tactic In The War Against Plastic Waste

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Kamal Hosen and Rahima Khartoum, Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, hold a photograph of their 14-year-old son, Din Mohammad. A victim of human trafficking, he was eventually rescued from a camp in Thailand. Shazia Rahman/Getty Images hide caption

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Shazia Rahman/Getty Images

Students exercise at a weight-loss summer camp in China's Shandong Province. The government promotes physical activity as the solution to a growing obesity problem. Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images

Prime Minister Narendra Modi (center) attends the opening of the 106th Indian Science Congress at Lovely Professional University on last week in Jalandhar, India. Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
Sally Deng for NPR

Why This Charity Isn't Afraid To Say It Failed

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Demonstrators ransacked this Ebola transit center in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the struggle to control the disease — and the protests it has sparked — will be part of the global health landscape in 2019. Alexis Huguet /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Huguet /AFP/Getty Images

Tea made from the wormwood plant. Wormwood tea has been used as a remedy for fever, liver and gall bladder ailments — and now it's being tested for the flatworm infection schistosomiasis. BIOSPHOTO hide caption

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BIOSPHOTO

If A Worm Makes You Sick, Can This Cup Of Tea Cure You?

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