Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.

This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802. Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

At 69, Kul Gautam has written his life story and won an award from the Peace Corps (which is fitting, since a volunteer was one of his early English teachers). John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

A World Food Programme convoy carries humanitarian aid to Aleppo, Syria. Getting food into conflict zones is a major hurdle — and a topic of discussion at the WFP's Innovation Accelerator. Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A man checks his phone to confirm that the charity GiveDirectly has transferred a cash grant to his account. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

Which Foreign Aid Programs Work? The U.S. Runs A Test — But Won't Talk About It

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Man Kaur of India celebrates after competing in the 100-meter sprint in the 100+ age category at the World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand, in April 2017. Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images

Pigs in a pen in a village in Linquan County, China. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

A Deadly Virus Threatens Millions Of Pigs In China

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Third graders on board a floating school in Bangladesh run by the nonprofit group Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha. Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR hide caption

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Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR

'Floating Schools' Make Sure Kids Get To Class When The Water Rises

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A little girl fills two jerrycans with water in the Korangi slum in Karachi. Fetching water is a duty that often falls on very young children. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

For Karachi's Water Mafia, Stolen H2O Is A 'Lucrative Business'

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The Sahara desert creeps up on a palm field. Fadel Senna /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fadel Senna /AFP/Getty Images

A Scientist Dreams Up A Plan To Stop The Sahara From Expanding

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