Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.

Francescangeli says boys sometimes work long hours and are often tasked with pushing carts to move rocks out of the mines. "Being a child in these places is really hard," he says. "If they have some time to spend in a free way, they like to be children. But their life doesn't permit them to be children so often." Simone Francescangeli hide caption

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Simone Francescangeli

A tsetse fly photographed in the zoological institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Tsetse fly bites transmit the parasitic disease called sleeping sickness. Anton Fric/AP hide caption

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Anton Fric/AP

Health workers help an unconfirmed Ebola patient into her bed inside a treatment center in Democratic Republic of the Congo. John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images

There's Growing Fear The Ebola Outbreak In Congo Could Get Much Worse

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A malnourished child receives medical treatment in Sanaa, Yemen. Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images

Why A 'War On Children' In Yemen Could Get Worse

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The circles on the map pinpoint the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects. The bigger the circle, the bigger the investment. The largest circles represent projects in the multibillion-dollar range. Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR

Bill Gates, co-founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, gestures to a jar of human feces as he speaks at the Reinvented Toilet Expo in Beijing on November 6. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

NPR's Morning Edition is looking to speak with people who are anticipating difficult conversations with their families on Thanksgiving. Katherine Du/NPR hide caption

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Katherine Du/NPR

Sister Bertha Lopez Chaves applies anti-inflammatory eyedrops to a migrant at a stadium in Mexico City where the caravan is resting. Her order is one of roughly 50 groups giving aid to the migrants in the Mexican capital. "We're just trying to deal with their basic needs so they can continue on," she says. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

Jacob Atem, who fled Sudan as a boy, was one of the storytellers at "Stoop Stories," a Baltimore event. Atem talked about his life as a "Lost Boy" and what happened when he settled in Michigan — like the time his foster mom grounded him just for wanting to punch a kid who'd insulted him. Brennen Jensen for NPR hide caption

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Brennen Jensen for NPR

Freya, a springer spaniel, is in training to detect malaria parasites in sock samples taken from children in Gambia. Two canine cohorts were used in a study on malaria detection. Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

A nurse vaccinates a baby against rotavirus, a deadly form of diarrhea. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Merck Pulls Out Of Agreement To Supply Life-Saving Vaccine To Millions Of Kids

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A U.N. military truck patrols on the road linking Mangina to Beni, the current epicenter of the Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo. John Wessels/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/Getty Images

Why Are People So Angry At Ebola Responders In The Democratic Republic Of The Congo?

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