Governing Governing

House Conservatives Say They Will Challenge Speaker Ryan On Any Broad Immigration Plan

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Ramona Morales, 79, had to pay about $6,000 in legal bills on top of a fine because one of her tenants kept chickens in the backyard of a rental house. Some Southern California cities are prosecuting code violators and slapping homeowners with gigantic legal bills they can't afford to pay. Jessica Chou for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Chou for NPR

Some California Cities Criminalize Nuisance Code Violations

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Joel Parker (left) and Leigh Salinas (right), participants in the Center for Austin's Future ATXelerator program, take a bike tour through the city on Jan. 13, 2018. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT 90.5 hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT 90.5

Taking A Page From 'Shark Tank' To Put Up Political Candidates

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Ousted White House staff secretary Rob Porter speaks to President Trump after remarks he made on violence in Charlottesville, Va., in August 2017 at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, N.J. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Six Kansas teens are running for governor, following the lead of Jack Bergeson (center). Some of the candidates are seen here participating in a forum at a high school in Lawrence, Kan., in October. Christopher Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Agency Conducting Government Background Checks Has Backlog Of 700,000

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After Passing Budget Deal, Congress Turns To Immigration Without A Clear Plan

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The White House at night last week. President Trump has picked a new ethics chief, who, unlike past appointments, has won praise from experts. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Congress approved a bipartisan budget agreement shortly before sunrise. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Trump Signs 2-Year Spending Pact

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FBI Says They Have No Evidence That Border Patrol Agent's Death Was A Homicide

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Illinois congressional candidate and avowed white supremacist Arthur Jones is unlikely to have any competition on the Republican ballot in November. The state GOP has denounced him and his candidacy but says it had no way to keep him off. Arthur Jones hide caption

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Arthur Jones

A White Supremacist May Be The Only Republican Running For A Seat in Congress

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Protesters unfurl a caricature of Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin at the end of her State of the State address on Monday. Emily Wendler/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Emily Wendler/StateImpact Oklahoma

Tax Cuts Put Oklahoma In A Bind. Now Gov. Fallin Wants To Raise Taxes

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Members Of Elite Baltimore Police Task Force Are On Trial For Corruption

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Veterans Are Divided On Response To Trump's Desire For Military Parade

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On Jan. 10, President Trump signed into law the bipartisan Interdict Act, to give federal agents more tools to curtail opioid trafficking. But, after declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency last fall, Trump has been slow to request money for treatment, critics note. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

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