Governing Governing

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday after the justices heard oral arguments on the corruption case against him. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Supreme Court May Be Leaning Toward Voiding Ex-Va. Governor's Corruption Conviction

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A container ship is unloaded at the Port of Los Angeles. Voters in this year's presidential election have deep feelings about trade — and often are at odds with each other about it. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

A Nation Engaged: Trade Stirs Up Sharp Debate In This Election Cycle

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The U.S. Justice Department has again found a way to access a locked iPhone without Apple's help, so investigators can access data involved in a court case. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A worker stokes a burning cauldron at a steel mill in Hefei, in eastern China's Anhui province in 2011. Chinese steelmakers are overproducing, hurting prices and jobs, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker says. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

FBI Executive Assistant Director for Science and Technology Amy Hess (from left) testifies on encryption Tuesday before a House panel, alongside the New York City Police Department's Thomas Galati and Indiana State Police Office Capt. Charles Cohen. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Activists hold a rally to protest the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement in front of the White House on Feb. 3. Trade has become a key issue in the U.S. presidential campaign. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress

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Maria Sanchez, a legal U.S. resident, narrowly missed being deported to her native Mexico for a felony she committed in 1998. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

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Richard Gonzales/NPR

Immigrant Felons And Deportation: One Grandmother's Case

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Labor Secretary Tom Perez speaks at a governors meeting in July. Under current rules, advisers "say things like 'we put our clients first,' " Perez said this week. Going forward, "this is no longer a slogan. It's the law." Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

White House To Financial Advisers: Put Savers' Interests First

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