Governing Governing

President Obama has proposed a rule requiring requiring overtime pay for more workers. The plan has drawn fire from many employers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Linda Boyle (left) and Lyn Coleman hold a photo of their children, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Caitlan Coleman, an American married to Canadian Joshua Boyle, was pregnant when the couple was abducted. Bill Gorman/AP hide caption

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Bill Gorman/AP

For Families Of U.S. Hostages, New Policy May Bring New Hope

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The state flag of Mississippi is unfurled against the front of the Governor's Mansion in Jackson, Miss., on Tuesday. The flag has been the center of renewed controversy since last week's racially motivated shooting of nine parishioners at a black church in South Carolina. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

President Obama delivers remarks in the Rose Garden after the U.S. Supreme Court's 6-3 ruling to uphold the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov

White House To Amend Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

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American Journalist James Foley, pictured in 2011. Foley's beheading at the hands of the Islamic State militant group has forced a debate over how the U.S. balances its policy of not paying ransoms. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Obama Administration To Shift Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

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Supporters of the Affordable Care Act rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The Supreme Court is considering the case of King v. Burwell, which could determine the fate of health care subsidies for millions of people. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Oil trains sit idle on the BNSF Railway's tracks in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Battle Over New Oil Train Standards Pits Safety Against Cost

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Using chemicals to control bugs or mold is common among commercial cannabis growers. But with no federal oversight, experts are concerned growers may be using dangerous pesticides. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Concern Grows Over Unregulated Pesticide Use Among Marijuana Growers

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