Governing Governing

Obama Acknowledges There's Much More Work To Do In New Orleans

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American Red Cross chief Gail McGovern (right) and Rep. Susan Brooks of Indiana tour the American Red Cross Digital Operations Center last year in Washington, D.C. Paul Morigi/AP Images for American Red Cross hide caption

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Paul Morigi/AP Images for American Red Cross

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Dr. Ben Carson, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former CEO Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina, U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, former New York Gov. George Pataki, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum (PA), Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker stand on the stage prior to the Voters First Presidential Forum. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Falling oil prices have put downward pressure on gasoline prices, now averaging $2.65 a gallon — about 85 cents cheaper than a year ago. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

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A Chinese worker is seen at a construction site in Beijing. Economic changes in China and in other places have reduced demand and prices for commodities like the metal in the building's structure. AP hide caption

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AP

Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's inspector general, testifies before a House committee in 2012 critical of the department's "Operation Fast and Furious." Thursday, he said a legal opinion from the department could block his office from getting documents crucial to his watchdog role. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Secretary of State John Kerry spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep at the State Department. Kerry said if Congress or a future president reverses a nuclear control agreement with Iran, U.S. credibility will suffer. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

U.S. Will Lose 'All Credibility' If Congress Rejects Nuclear Deal, Kerry Says

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Republicans Likely Will Oppose Iran Deal, But Find It Hard To Derail

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