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House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks during a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol about lawsuit he and other Republican leaders filed against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and congressional officials in an effort to block the House of Representatives from using a proxy voting system to allow for remote voting during the coronavirus pandemic. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

An aerial view shows people gathered in painted circles on the grass encouraging social distancing last week at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

WHO Warns Of A 'Second Peak' In Countries That Reopen Too Quickly

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Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you're allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state. Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library hide caption

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Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library

How The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

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Writer and activist Larry Kramer, here in 1989, was an unapologetically loud and irrepressible voice in the fight against AIDS. Sara Krulwich/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Krulwich/Getty Images

Larry Kramer, Pioneering AIDS Activist And Writer, Dies At 84

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Our World in Data

Some Countries Have Brought New Cases Down To Nearly Zero. How Did They Do It?

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The move comes after the World Health Organization halted clinical trials of the drug as a treatment, citing a study that found no benefit and a higher mortality rate for hospitalized patients. A box of hydroxychloroquine, under the brand name Plaquenil, is seen in a pharmacy in Paris. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

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Chesnot/Getty Images

Avery Hoppa with her 3-year-old daughter Zelda. Hoppa says she's "incredibly grateful" that she and her husband still have jobs. But she says it "feels weird to be a consumer right now" as many are struggling financially. Avery Hoppa hide caption

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Avery Hoppa

Residents of the Colombian capital Bogotá hang red rags from their windows and balconies to signal their need for help with food during the coronavirus pandemic. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

During Colombia's Coronavirus Lockdown, Needy Residents Signal SOS With Red Rags

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President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping, shown in 2019, have faced criticism for their handling of the coronavirus. Both are now pushing hard for a vaccine. The United States has already agreed to pay a drug company more than $1 billion to produce a vaccine that's yet to be approved. Xi says if China succeeds in developing a vaccine, it will be declared "a global public good." Kevin Lamarque/Reuters hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

In The Battle Against COVID-19, A Risk Of 'Vaccine Nationalism'

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

In Large Texas Cities, Access To Coronavirus Testing May Depend On Where You Live

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People enjoy on the beach in Long Branch, New Jersey on May 24, during the Memorial Day weekend holiday. In many parts of the country, states are starting to reopen and relax regulations but Dr. Ashish Jha, Director of Harvard's Global Health Institute, said we will likely see a lot more sickness and deaths in the summer months. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

99,000 People Dead And A Dire Summer Prediction

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From left: Comedians Natasha Chandel, Abdullah Afzal and Mariam Sobh. They each performed a set during the Socially Distant Eid Comedy Night Special, a virtual event hosted by the Concordia Forum. Facebook/ Screengrabs by NPR hide caption

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Facebook/ Screengrabs by NPR

Memorial Day weekend at Robert Moses State Park on Fire Island, N.Y. As the pandemic continues, Harvard's Dr. Ashish Jha says, mask wearing, social distancing and robust strategies of testing and contact tracing will be even more important. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nearing 100,000 COVID-19 Deaths, U.S. Is Still 'Early In This Outbreak'

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With physician offices not seeing patients with COVID-19 symptoms in April, Timothy Regan said he had little choice when Denver Health directed him first to its urgent care facility and then to its emergency room. "I felt bad, but I had been dealing with it for a while," he says. Ethan Welty for KHN hide caption

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Ethan Welty for KHN

Cathy Cody is owner/operator of No Ifs Ands Or Butts About It Janitorial Services & More, LLC in Albany, Ga. Jason Cabatit/JCabatit Photography hide caption

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Jason Cabatit/JCabatit Photography

In Homes Left Empty By COVID-19, This Georgia Woman Packs Up The Memories

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Workers prepare takeout orders May 1 in Houston. For more than two out of three unemployed workers, jobless benefits exceed their old pay, researchers say. That discrepancy can raise awkward questions for workers, bosses and policymakers. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

For Many, $600 Jobless Benefit Makes It Hard To Return To Work

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