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Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, federally protected right to abortion, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

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Abortion providers shift practices as states enact bans

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Whole Woman's Health of Minnesota, a clinic that opened to patients in February, is one of only eight that provide abortions in the state and is located just a few minutes from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Christina Saint Louis/KHN hide caption

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Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

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A mother holds her 1-year-old son as he receives the child Covid-19 vaccine in his thigh at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, Mass., on June 21, 2022. The temple was one of the first sites in the state to offer vaccinations to anyone in the public. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Juweek Adolphe/KHN and NPR

Sick and struggling to pay, 100 million people in the U.S. live with medical debt

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A Black woman receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Tampa, Fla. Black Americans have died of the disease at a rate more than double that of white people. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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'1619 Project' journalist lays bare why Black Americans 'live sicker and die quicker'

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Former U.S. Rep. Joe Cunningham arrives at a debate for Democrats seeking their party's nomination in South Carolina's governor's race on Friday, June 10, 2022, in Columbia, S.C. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff as the United States neared the 1 millionth death attributed to COVID. A new study points to differences in health outcomes between Republican and Democratic leaning counties. Win McNamee / Getty Images hide caption

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US Forces in Afghanistan work with a German Shepherd to inspect a vehicle for explosives. IEDs and other bombs led to brain injuries in service people but appear so far to not increase their risk of CTE. ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CTE is rare in brains of deceased service members, study finds

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Some medical tests, such as MRIs done early for uncomplicated low back pain and routine vitamin D tests "just to be thorough," are considered "low-value care" and can lead to further testing that can cost patients thousands of dollars. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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A Google search for Obamacare plans can direct consumers to a series of "lead-generating" websites: nongovernmental webpages that connect insurance brokers to consumers. Getty Images hide caption

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California Assembly member Buffy Wicks, a Democrat, speaks on the chamber floor in January 2020. In 2019, on the 46th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, she told the story of her own abortion. Krishnia Parker/California State Assembly Democratic Caucus hide caption

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Krishnia Parker/California State Assembly Democratic Caucus

California lawmakers ramp up efforts to become a sanctuary state for abortion rights

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in an abortion case this week. The court's conservative justices are overturning Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-abortion activists protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, May 23. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Fentanyl took root in Montana and in communities across the Mountain West region during the pandemic, and overall drug overdose deaths are disproportionately affecting Native Americans. Tony Bynum for KHN hide caption

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Tony Bynum for KHN

Tribal leaders sound the alarm after fentanyl overdoses spike at Blackfeet Nation

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