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Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in July concerning Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation. It is thought that a challenge to Roe v. Wade could have a chance of passing now that he is confirmed. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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When one of Jose Nuñez's retinas was damaged by diabetes in 2016, the Los Angeles truck driver expected his Medicaid managed care policy to coordinate treatment. But Centene, the private insurer that manages his policy, gave him the runaround, he says, and he lost sight in that eye. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Demonstrators hold signs as Democratic leaders speak with reporters outside the U.S. Capitol June 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Midterm Election Could Reshape Health Policy

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President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Randy and Karen O'Burke together at their son's home in Hendersonville, Tenn., last week. "Apparently, I'm pretty much of a miracle," Randy says. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

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Ed Rendell, former governor of Pennsylvania, has taken a strong stand on supervised injection sites. Andrew Harrer/Getty Images hide caption

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'Come And Arrest Me': Former Pa. Governor Defies Justice Department On Safe Injection

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President Trump attends a signing ceremony for health care measures in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Wednesday, the same day USA Today published an opinion column on the topic by the president. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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FACT CHECK: Trump's False Claims On 'Medicare For All'

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As a counselor, Niasha Fray saw firsthand the obstacles black women face in breast cancer treatment. She's now program director of the Duke Center for Community and Population Health Improvement. Justin Cook for NPR hide caption

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Justin Cook for NPR

Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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