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On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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TRUMP INTERNATIONAL HOTEL - COLUMBUS CIRCLE, NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES - 2017/01/15: Hundreds of activists and allies from the newly-formed anti-Trump group Rise & Resist staged a peaceful protest at Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York City, to fight against the radical changes to the American healthcare system proposed by the Trump Administration and Republicans. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Frame Canada

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When Angela Settles' husband, Darius, got sick with COVID-19, he was worried about medical bills. He worked two jobs but had no health insurance. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN News

Hospital Bills For Uninsured COVID-19 Patients Are Covered, But No One Tells Them

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Rural communities across the country, places largely spared during the early days of the pandemic, are now seeing spikes in infections and hospitalizations. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 Surges In Rural Communities, Overwhelming Some Local Hospitals

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Karla Monterroso says after going to Alameda Hospital in May with a very accelerated heart rate, very low blood pressure and cycling oxygen levels, her entire experience was one of being punished for being 'insubordinate.' Kenneth Eke/Code2040 hide caption

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Kenneth Eke/Code2040

'All You Want Is To Be Believed': Sick With COVID-19 And Facing Racial Bias In The ER

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COVID-19 mortality rates are going down, according to studies of two large hospital systems, partly thanks to improvements in treatment. Here, clinicians care for a patient in July at an El Centro, Calif., hospital. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Studies Point To Big Drop In COVID-19 Death Rates

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A health care worker prepares to screen people for the coronavirus at a testing site in Landover, Md., in March. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Health Care Workers Ask Therapist: 'Why Aren't More People Taking This Seriously?'

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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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While coronavirus vaccine trials are ongoing and a U.S. vaccine has yet to be approved, state health officials are planning ahead for how to eventually immunize a large swath of the population. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of COVID-19 Vaccines

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COVID-19 Contact Tracing Workforce Barely 'Inching Up' As Cases Surge

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The phase 3 trial of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been paused as the company investigates what it says is a study participant's "unexplained illness." Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and other Democrats are making the Affordable Care Act the centerpiece of their opposition to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at Barrett's confirmation hearing. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump addressed a rally on Saturday, nine days after he tested positive for the coronavirus. Several health experts told NPR that based on what Trump's doctors have said about Trump's coronavirus experience, he's likely no longer contagious. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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"Our leaders have largely claimed immunity for their actions. But this election gives us the power to render judgment," reads a New England Journal of Medicine editorial signed by some three dozen editors. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Nurse practitioner Willie Rios collects nasal swab for a coronavirus test from Araceli Merlos at St. John's Well Child and Family Center in Los Angeles, CA. Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Workers clean plexiglass dividers installed at the University of Utah in preparation for the debate between Sen. Kamala Harris and Vice President Pence. Kim Raff/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Raff/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The federal government is starting to enforce new COVID-19 data reporting requirements for hospitals. Studio 642/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Studio 642/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

A road sign for a nearby hospital along a rural road outside Sandwich, Ill., in April. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Getting Health Care Was Already Tough In Rural Areas. The Pandemic Has Made It Worse

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President Trump's team of medical specialists overseeing his care at Walter Reed National Military Medical center. He will still have access to round-the-clock care from the White House medical staff. Brendan Smialowski /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP via Getty Images

Is that sneezing or coughing fit a sign of allergies, a cold, the flu or COVID-19? If you also have a fever — a temperature above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher — those symptoms probably signal infection and not just allergies acting up. (Wait 30 minutes after eating or drinking to get an accurate measurement.) sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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