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Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Physicians face long hours, frustrating paperwork and sometimes difficult patients. But researchers aren't so clear on whether burnout is the right word to describe their problems. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images

Health insurers who offer Medicare Advantage plans have permission to soon require patients to try less expensive alternatives to some before receiving pricier drugs. Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images hide caption

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Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Despite abuse deterrent formulation, Purdue Pharma's OxyContin continues to be used by some people with opioid addiction to get high. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Insurer To Purdue Pharma: We Won't Pay For OxyContin Anymore

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Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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Baby boomers who use marijuana seem to be using it more often than in previous years, a recent survey finds — 5.7 percent of respondents ages 50 to 64 said they'd tried it in the past month. The drug is also gaining popularity among people in their 70s and 80s. Manonallard/Getty Images hide caption

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The total bill for Drew Calver's four-day hospital stay at St. David's Medical Center in April 2017 was $164,941. His insurer paid $55,840, leaving Calver responsible for the unpaid balance of $108,951.31. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Mary Horman (left), a registered nurse for Clackamas County, and Liz Baca, a disease intervention specialist for the county, search for the right address in an Oregon neighborhood. Part of their job is to get information to people who may have a serious, treatable infection, yet not realize it. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Discreetly Tracking Down Sex Partners To Stop A Surge In STDs

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Supervised injection sites, like Insite in Vancouver, Canada, provide drug users with clean needles and other supplies to help prevent the spread of disease. Elana Gordon for WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon for WHYY

Michelle Knox on the TED stage. Jean-Jacques Halans/Jean-Jacques Halans/TED hide caption

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Jean-Jacques Halans/Jean-Jacques Halans/TED

Michelle Knox: Can Talking About Death Take Fear And Stress Out Of The Inevitable?

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Intermountain Healthcare, whose Intermountain Medical Center Patient Tower in Murray, Utah, is seen here, is a leader in the generic drug company being launched by hospitals. Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare