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Various signs are posted outside the emergency room entrance on Nov. 1 at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange. Orange County's health officer has declared a local health emergency in response to increases in respiratory illnesses and an onslaught of the quickly spreading RSV, a respiratory virus that is most dangerous in young children. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

A Triple Serving Of Flu, COVID And RSV Hits Hospitals Ahead Of Thanksgiving

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DrAfter123/Getty Images; Katherine Sheehan; JJ Geiger; Photo Illustration by Kaz Fantone/NPR

'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

According to the CDC, out of all the American adults who have had COVID — and that's a lot of us — one in five went on to develop long COVID symptoms. While so many are struggling with this new disease, it can be hard for people to know how to take care of themselves.

'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

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States differ on how best to spend $26B from settlement in opioid cases

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Many hospitals are now partnering with financing companies to offer payment plans when patients and their families can't afford their bills. The catch: the plans can come with interest that significantly increases a patient's debt. sesame/Getty Images hide caption

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sesame/Getty Images

Weeks after her miscarriage was confirmed, Christina Zielke started bleeding heavily while on a trip out of town. At an ER in Ohio, she was given tests but no treatment, and discharged soon after, still bleeding. She says she was told the hospital needed proof there was no fetal development. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Her miscarriage left her bleeding profusely. An Ohio ER sent her home to wait

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A medical worker gestures to an Ebola patient inside an isolation center in the village of Madudu, Uganda. The country is taking several public health measures to try to stem the outbreak. Hajarah Nalwadda/AP hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/AP

Depression and Alzheimer's are relatively common and the subject of a lot of research. Cemile Bingol / Getty Images hide caption

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Cemile Bingol / Getty Images

Depression And Alzheimer's Treatments At A Crossroads

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Evan Woody has needed round-the-clock care since his brain injury and lives with his parents in Dunwoody, Ga. His father, Philip, says his family has some plans in place for Evan's future, but one question is still unanswered: Where will Evan live when he can no longer live with his parents? Philip Woody hide caption

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Philip Woody

An empty exam room at Northland Family Planning in Sterling Heights, Mich. Paulette Parker/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Paulette Parker/Michigan Radio

Inside a Michigan clinic, patients talk about abortion — and a looming statewide vote

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A forest cobra is harvested for its venom at the Research Institute of Applied Biology of Guinea. Its venom will be analyzed for various toxins and help inform future antidote development. Guy Peterson for NPR hide caption

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Guy Peterson for NPR

Millions of Americans are prescribed statins to reduce the risk of heart disease, but many prefer to take supplements like fish oil, garlic and flaxseed. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Statins vs. supplements: New study finds one is 'vastly superior' to cut cholesterol

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Susie Talevski has gone through years of legal back-and-forth with the state agency in Indiana that operates the nursing home where her father, Gorgi, resided before his death. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

The federal government's new opioid prescribing guidelines may help doctors better manage patients with chronic pain who need consistent doses of pain medicines. For example, one patient takes tramadol regularly for serious pain caused by osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Health experts agree that the unseasonably early surges of RSV cases, especially among children, are a consequence of lifting COVID-19 precautions, which served to protect the public from a variety of viruses. AP hide caption

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AP
Subin Yang for NPR

Shopping for ACA health insurance? Here's what's new this year

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Diagnosed with cancer five years ago, Monica Reed of Knoxville, Tennessee, was left with nearly $10,000 in medical bills she couldn't pay. Medical debt is more prevalent among the Black community in Knoxville, than among whites. Jamar Coach for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Jamar Coach for KHN and NPR

Why Black Americans are more likely to be saddled with medical debt

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Khloe Tinker, 5, is measured ahead of an appointment at the Doniphan Family Clinic in Doniphan, Missouri. The clinic is the only source for specialized pediatric care in its rural Ozark county. Sebastián Martínez Valdivia/KBIA hide caption

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Sebastián Martínez Valdivia/KBIA

Why pediatricians are worried about the end of the federal COVID emergency

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The civil war in Ethiopia is destroying the medical system in the northern region of Tigray. Iman Raza Khan/Getty Images hide caption

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Iman Raza Khan/Getty Images

Twelve states have declined to expand Medicaid for low-income Americans. In South Dakota, 53% of voters support changing that, according to a recent South Dakota State University poll. Riley Bunch/GPB hide caption

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Riley Bunch/GPB

Expanding Medicaid is popular. That's why it's a key issue in some statewide midterms

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