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A woman recovering from fever linked to COVID-19 checks medications in her home in Mineola, N.Y., this spring. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Nearly Two-Thirds Of U.S. Households Struck By COVID-19 Face Financial Trouble

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Each mobile clinic has a nurse, a counselor and a peer specialist — all trained to drive a 34-foot-long motor home. "I never thought when I went to nursing school that I'd be doing this," says Christi Couron as she pumps 52 gallons of diesel fuel into the vehicle. Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News

Three potential coronavirus vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Gaithersburg, Md., in March 2020. The company has moved into phase 3 trials in the U.K. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Novavax Researcher Says No Chance Of A 'Shortcut' In Vaccine Safety

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An illegal roadside graveyard in northeastern Namibia. People in the townships surrounding Rundu, a town on the border to Angola, are too poor to afford a funeral plot at the municipal graveyard — and resorted to burying their dead next to a dusty gravel road just outside of the town. Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images

Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

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A pregnant woman waits in line for groceries at a food pantry in Waltham, Mass., during the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Data Begin To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

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Nurses clap after Kym Villamer and her colleague Dawn Jones sing "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" at New York-Presbyterian Queens Hospital's new COVID-19 ward. Robert Gonzales hide caption

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Robert Gonzales

Family Ordeal Catapults A Young Filipina To The U.S. — And The Pandemic Front Lines

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Hospitals may soon be at risk of losing a critical funding stream — Medicare funding — if they don't comply with new COVID-19 data reporting requirements. John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Administration Plans Crackdown On Hospitals Failing To Report COVID-19 Data

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Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt

Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

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More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Joseph Varon notifies the family of a patient who died inside the coronavirus unit at Houston's United Memorial Medical Center on July 6. Varon tells NPR he's "living on adrenaline." David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Demonstrators pray in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on July 8, a day the court ruled that employers with religious objections can decline to provide contraception coverage under the Affordable Care Act. With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the ACA's future is in doubt. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

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A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kaz Fantone/NPR

About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Latinos Report Financial Strain As Pandemic Erodes Income And Savings

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A child washes her hands at a day care center in Connecticut last month. A detailed look at COVID-19 deaths in U.S. kids and young adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the great majority are children of color. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Mercy Hospital & Medical Center survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 ― but it lost the battle of modern health care economics. In July, Chicago's first hospital told regulators that it will end inpatient services as soon as February. Taylor Glascock for KHN hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for KHN
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As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time

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On Jan. 23, workers started building the Huoshenshan hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan, China. The photo above was taken on Jan. 30. Construction was done on Feb. 2, and the 1,000-bed hospital opened on Feb. 3. Today it stands empty of patients. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/Getty Images