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A droplet falls from a syringe after a health care worker was injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine last year at a hospital in Providence, R.I. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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At the region's biggest hospital, Kootenai Health in Coeur d'Alene, 97% of COVID-19 patients are unvaccinated and all of the intensive care unit beds are filled. Education Images/Universal Image via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/Universal Image via Getty Images

Idaho's Hospitals Are Overwhelmed, But Many Locals Remain Skeptical Of Vaccines

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New research shows racial disparities in opioid overdose rates, with the rate of deaths among Black people growing faster than in other groups. The researchers are calling for expanding access to drug treatment and to education on how to prevent overdoses using the antidote drug, naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, second from right, speaks during a news conference on Operation Warp Speed in January, 2021. With Azar from left are Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chief science adviser to Operation Warp Speed, Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and U.S. Army Gen. Gustave Perna, chief operating officer of Operation Warp Speed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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ECMO is the highest level of life support — beyond a ventilator, which pumps oxygen via a tube through the windpipe into the lungs. Instead, the ECMO process basically functions as a heart and lungs outside of the body — routing the blood via tubing to a machine that oxygenates it, then pumps it back into the patient. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

Across The COVID-Ravaged South, High-Level Life Support Is Difficult To Find

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In Idaho, a record number of people are hospitalized with COVID-19, raising the possibility of rationing medical care. Many states are grappling with the fallout of the delta variant's surge in cases. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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A COVID Surge Is Overwhelming U.S. Hospitals, Raising Fears Of Rationed Care

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Health experts and medical groups are pushing to stamp out the growing use of ivermectin, an anti-parasite drug, to treat COVID-19, amid warnings that it can cause harmful side effects and that there's little evidence it helps. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

Nurses work at a COVID-19 testing day for students and school faculty at Brandeis Elementary School on in Louisville, Ky. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Caught Between Parents And Politicians, Nurses Fear Another School Year With COVID-19

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A deeply divided Supreme Court is allowing a Texas law that bans most abortions to remain in force, stripping women of the right to an abortion in most cases in the nation's second-largest state. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Did The Supreme Court Just Overturn Roe v. Wade?

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Leaders at two dating-app giants in Texas — Match Group and Bumble — have moved to set up funds to aid people affected by the state's new abortion ban. Here, abortion-rights supporters march near the Texas Capitol in Austin this year. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Allie Henderson with her sister Claire (left) and her mom, LeAnn, outside their home recently in Terry, Miss. "I want people to get vaccinated — because I know what it feels like," Allie says of her near-fatal encounter with COVID-19 this year. Imani Khayyam for KHN hide caption

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Imani Khayyam for KHN

Inmates do a deep cleaning in a cell pod to prevent the spread of COVID-19 at the San Diego County Jail in April 2020. A new study says crowded jails may have contributed to millions of COVID-19 cases across the United States. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Health care providers who administer a COVID-19 vaccine "off-label" face legal liability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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A third shot of the Moderna vaccine boosts protection across age groups, notably in older adults, the company says. Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag hide caption

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Daniela Draghici in the living room of her apartment in Bucharest. Draghici is an abortion-rights advocate who served as a family planning program manager for a U.S.-funded Romanian nonprofit group from 1992 to 2002. Ioana Moldovan for NPR hide caption

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