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Health Care

Licensed vocational nurse Denise Saldana vaccinates Pri DeSilva, associate director of Individual and Corporate Giving, with a fourth Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster at the Dr. Kenneth Williams Health Center in Los Angeles, Nov. 1, 2022. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

The FDA considers a major shift in the nation's COVID vaccine strategy

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Protesters at the March for Life on Jan. 20, 2023, in Washington D.C. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

At the first March for Life post-Roe, anti-abortion activists say fight isn't over

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With limited paid family leave offered by her job, Ruby B. Sutton, an environmental engineer at a mining site in northeastern Nevada, decided to stay home with her new baby full time. Jazmin Orozco Rodriguez/KHN hide caption

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Jazmin Orozco Rodriguez/KHN

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 25, 2022 in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The U.S. faces 'unprecedented uncertainty' regarding abortion law, legal scholar says

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A health care navigator helps people sign up for Obamacare plans in Dallas in 2017. This year, federal funding for navigators was higher than it had been under the Trump administration. A record number of people signed up for plans. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

More than 16 million people bought insurance on Healthcare.gov, a record high

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Nurses from Mount Sinai Hospital strike outside the hospital on Monday in the Upper East Side neighborhood of New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Writer Aubrey Gordon wants to change the way people think and talk about fatness, including how the word "fat" is used. Beth Olson/Beacon Press hide caption

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Beth Olson/Beacon Press

Anti-fatness keeps fat people on the margins, says Aubrey Gordon

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Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin has been released from the hospital and has returned to Buffalo, doctors say. Here, Hamlin is shown prior to the start of the first half of a preseason NFL football game, Saturday, Aug. 28, 2021, in Orchard Park, N.Y. Joshua Bessex/AP hide caption

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Joshua Bessex/AP

Jeff and Kareen King received a hospital bill for $160,000 a few weeks after Jeff had a procedure to restore his heart rhythm. Bram Sable-Smith/KHN hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith/KHN

12 月 7 日,一名老年人在中国重庆的一个临时接种点接种了新冠疫苗。对疫苗有效性和安全性的担忧导致人们不确定是否应该接种,尤其是对于疫苗接种率相对较低的老年人而言。 He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images

Florida's only baby box launched at a fire station in Ocala on Dec. 18, 2020. For the first time, a newborn was surrendered there recently. Safe Haven Baby Boxes hide caption

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Safe Haven Baby Boxes

The Food and Drug Administration announced it has loosened some restrictions on the pill mifepristone, allowing it to be dispensed by more pharmacies and without an in-person exam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Dr. Sarah Prager and Dr. Kelly Quinley work together for the nonprofit TEAMM, Training, Education and Advocacy in Miscarriage Management, which operates on the premise that "many people experience miscarriage before they're established with an OBGYN." Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

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Rosem Morton for NPR

Bithaniya Fieseha, a high school senior, graduates from the Youth Public Health Ambassador program run by Virginia's Fairfax County Health Department. Will Schermerhorn/Fairfax County Health Department hide caption

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Will Schermerhorn/Fairfax County Health Department

Short on community health workers, a county trains teens as youth ambassadors

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Kaitlyn and Landon Joshua were worried for Kaitlyn's health when she started to bleed heavily and had labor-like pains early in her pregnancy. But two different emergency rooms she went to wouldn't confirm she was miscarrying or explain her treatment options. Claire Bangser for NPR hide caption

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Claire Bangser for NPR

Bleeding and in pain, she couldn't get 2 Louisiana ERs to answer: Is it a miscarriage?

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The Food and Drug Administration announced Friday that it will overhaul packaging labels for the emergency contraceptive pill, Plan B, that women can take after having sex to prevent a pregnancy. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

An investigation of more than 500 U.S. hospitals show that many use aggressive practices to collect on unpaid medical bills. More than two-thirds have policies that allow them to sue patients or take other legal actions against them, such as garnishing wages.This includes high-profile medical centers such as the Mayo Clinic. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

In 2013, Grace E. Elliott spent a night in a hospital in Florida for a kidney infection that was treated with antibiotics. Eight years later, she got a large bill from the health system that bought the hospital. This bill was for an unrelated surgical procedure she didn't need and never received. It was a case of mistaken identity, she knew, but proving that wasn't easy. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

The case of the two Grace Elliotts: a medical bill mystery

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