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Health Care

Democratic presidential candidates former Vice President Joe Biden (left), Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (right) debate different ways to expand health coverage in America. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

"The profession we love has been taken over," psychiatrist and novelist Samuel Shem tells NPR, "with us sitting there in front of screens all day, doing data entry in a computer factory." Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Maryland now offers the country's first master's degree in the study of the science and therapeutics of cannabis. Pictured, an employee places a bud into a bottle for a customer at a weed dispensary in Denver, Colo. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland

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Brelahn Wyatt, a Navy ensign and second-year medical student, shares a hug with Shetland. The dog's military commission does not entitle him to salutes. Julie Rovner/KHN hide caption

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Julie Rovner/KHN

"We make sure that everybody can afford [public health insurance], but we don't require you to take it. And partly I think that's just the right policy, because I think people should be able to choose," Pete Buttigieg said. Lucy Hewett for NPR hide caption

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Lucy Hewett for NPR

'Just The Right Policy': Pete Buttigieg On His 'Medicare For All Who Want It' Plan

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Tom and Dana Saputo sit in their backyard with their three dogs. Tom Saputo's double-lung transplant was fully covered by insurance, but he was responsible for an $11,524.79 portion of the charge for an air ambulance ride. Anna Almendrala/KHN hide caption

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Anna Almendrala/KHN

Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first encountered Ebola in 1976, before it had been identified. Since then, from his post at the Congo National Institute for Biomedical Research, he has led the global search for a cure. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

This Congolese Doctor Discovered Ebola But Never Got Credit For It — Until Now

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Kate Clyatt, 28, works seasonally as a ranch hand in southwest Montana, and relies on the state's Medicaid program for health coverage. "Ranching is just not a job with a lot of money in it," Clyatt says. "I don't know at what point I'm going to be able to get off of Medicaid." Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Rural Seasonal Workers Worry About Montana Medicaid's Work Requirements

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During recent blackouts in California, people like Fern Brown (left) and her sister, Lavina Suehead, came to a pop-up community center at the Auburn, Calf., fairgrounds to use electricity. Brown, 81, needed a treatment for her chronic lung condition. Mark Kreidler/California Healthline hide caption

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Mark Kreidler/California Healthline

Colorado estimates that about 15% of the 12 million letters it sends to beneficiaries of public assistance programs each year are returned unopened, left to pile up in county offices like this one in Colorado Springs. That amounts to about 1.8 million pieces of undelivered mail each year statewide. Markian Hawryluk/KHN hide caption

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Markian Hawryluk/KHN

Arline Feilen (left) and her sister, Kathy McCoy, at their mother's home in the Chicago suburbs. The biggest chunk of Feilen's bill was $16,480 for four nights in a room shared with another patient. McCoy joked that it would have been cheaper to stay at the Ritz-Carlton. Alyssa Schukar for KHN hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for KHN

A Woman's Grief Led To A Mental Health Crisis And A $21,634 Hospital Bill

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Presidential Candidate Forum on LGBTQ Issues last month in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images for GLAAD hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images for GLAAD

Elizabeth Warren's Ambiguity On Health Care Comes With Some Side Effects

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Paramedics in Portland, Maine, respond to a call for a heroin overdose. A new report estimates some $60 billion was spent on health care related to opioid addiction in 2018. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

The Real Cost Of The Opioid Epidemic: An Estimated $179 Billion In Just 1 Year

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Officer Brian Cregg checks in with a man who says he is homeless and living in his car in Concord, N.H. In Concord, as in many parts of the Northeast, widespread use of meth is new, police say, and is changing how they approach interactions with people who seem to be delusional. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Is It A Meth Case Or Mental Illness? Police Who Need To Know Often Can't Tell

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Though complications from the flu can be deadly for people who are especially vulnerable, including pregnant women and their newborns, typically only about half of pregnant women get the needed vaccination, U.S. statistics show. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Getty Images

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant

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Addario's coverage of maternal mortality took her to a remote village in Badakhshan province, Afghanistan in 2009, where she photographed a midwife giving a prenatal check in a private home. "In these areas someone will announce that a doctor and a midwife are coming, and any pregnant and lactating women within a certain radius come if they want prenatal or postnatal care," she says. Lynsey Addario hide caption

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Lynsey Addario