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Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

People get tested for the coronavirus at a drive-through site in Phoenix last month. In Arizona, the portion of tests coming back positive now hovers around 24%, more than three times the national average. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Tables are marked with X's for social distancing in the outdoor dining area of a restaurant in Los Angeles, Wednesday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered a three-week closure of bars and indoor operations of restaurants and certain other businesses in Los Angeles and 18 other counties as the state copes with increasing cases of COVID-19. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Tuesday. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

Fauci: Mixed Messaging On Masks Set U.S. Public Health Response Back

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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Dr. Danielle Ofri, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error, says medical mistakes are likely to increase as resource-strapped hospitals treat a rapid influx of COVID-19 patients. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Doctor Confronts Medical Errors — And Flaws In The System That Create Mistakes

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Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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A health worker in personal protective equipment stands in a COVID-19 intensive care unit in Taiz, Yemen. Ahmad Al-Basha /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Basha /AFP via Getty Images

The governor of Texas is encouraging people to wear masks in public and stay home if possible, as the number of COVID-19 cases spikes in the state. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Q&A: Are Face Mask Requirements Legal?

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Alexis McGill Johnson becomes the permanent president and CEO of Planned Parenthood after serving in the role on an interim basis. Here, she addresses a rally against white supremacy last year in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tubers prepare to float the Comal River in New Braunfels, Texas, on Thursday. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said Wednesday that the state is facing a "massive outbreak" of the coronavirus and that some new local restrictions may be needed to preserve hospital space for new patients. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Plastic fencing and landscaping boulders replaced homeless campsites on this block in downtown Denver. Advocates for the homeless fear that displacing encampments risks spreading the coronavirus throughout the homeless community. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News

Surrounded by some members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, President Trump speaks at a press conference on COVID-19 in March in the Rose Garden. Of the 27 task force members, two are women, standing to Trump's left: Dr. Deborah Birx and Seema Verma (holding the sheaf of papers). Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies Tuesday during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the Trump administration's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images

Bamby Salcedo, here speaking at a 2017 rally, is president and CEO of the TransLatin@ Coalition, one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed to keep Obama-era civil rights protections in place. "Everyone deserves easy access to health care," Salcedo says, "and health care that is respectful of who we are." Amanda Edwards/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda Edwards/WireImage/Getty Images

Matt Ford is seen in Verona, Wis., with one of his caregivers, Grace Brunette. An accident in 1987 left Ford paralyzed in all four limbs. He needs help getting in and out of bed, preparing meals, using the bathroom and driving. Brunette recently finished a physician assistant program at the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Matt Ford hide caption

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Matt Ford

Health workers and others rallied in Seattle during a Doctors For Justice event on June 6, protesting police brutality in the wake of George Floyd's death. Medical training needs a hard look too, doctors say: Students of color and LGBTQ people often bear the brunt of what can be a bullying culture. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ryder/Getty Images