Health Care The state of health care, health insurance, new medical research, disease prevention, and drug treatments. Interviews, news, and commentary from NPR's correspondents. Subscribe to podcasts.

Health Care

Medical staff prepare for an intubation procedure on a COVID-19 patient in a Houston intensive care unit. In some parts of the U.S., as hospitals get crowded, hospital leaders are worried they may need to implement crisis standards of care. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Adam Woodrum and his son, Robert, get ready for a bike ride near their home in Carson City, Nev., this month. During the summer, Robert had a bike accident that resulted in a hefty bill from the family's insurer. Maggie Starbard for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Maggie Starbard for KHN

A Kid, A Minor Bike Accident And A $19,000 Medical Bill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/937971995/939002710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A flu vaccine is administered at a walk-up COVID-19 testing site, in San Fernando, Calif. Emergency use authorization is expected soon for vaccines for COVID-19. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

A lab technician sorts blood samples for a COVID-19 vaccination study at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla., on Aug. 13. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Vaccine Expert: Once A COVID Vaccine Is Available, 'Don't Overthink It. Don't Wait'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/938375308/938538542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saint Luke's Hospital of Kansas City is one of the 18 hospitals in the Saint Luke's Health System. Two-thirds of the COVID-19 patients transferred to Saint Luke's from rural areas need intensive care. "We get the sickest of the sick," says Dr. Marc Larsen. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Moreno/KCUR

Rural Areas Send Their Sickest Patients To The Cities, Straining Hospital Capacity

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933843172/937847145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A female Aedes aegypti mosquito feeds on human skin. James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

ApiJect makes a disposable injection device that the company says can be mass-produced to deliver vaccines and medications around the world. ApiJect hide caption

toggle caption
ApiJect

As Vaccine Approvals Loom, U.S. Funds A Backup Plan For Delivery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/936207326/936567353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers are learning that there is a significant relationship between sleep and dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Basak Gurbuz Derman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Basak Gurbuz Derman/Getty Images

Deep Sleep Protects Against Alzheimer's, Growing Evidence Shows

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/935519117/935788632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Iowa Doctor Says Money And Staffing Needed To Handle Coronavirus In Nursing Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/935410843/935503796" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A health care worker holds an injection syringe of the phase 3 vaccine trial, developed against the novel coronavirus pandemic by the U.S. Pfizer and German BioNTech company, at the Ankara University Ibni Sina Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Who Gets The Vaccine First? And How Will They Get It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933805434/934787495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical staff members treat a patient in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at Houston's United Memorial Medical Center on Tuesday. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Hospitals Pushed To The Brink, Governors Warn Of Health Care Shortages

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933057943/934300336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical staff treat a patient in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on Nov. 10. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

'You Can See The Regret': ICU Nurse On Patients Who Failed To Take COVID Precautions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/934266487/934328301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Albert Bourla, chairman and CEO of Pfizer, sold millions of dollars' worth of company stock on Monday as part of a preset plan. But NPR found irregularities about when the CEO entered into that plan. Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pfizer CEO Sold Millions In Stock After Coronavirus Vaccine News, Raising Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933957580/933967408" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Pretty Mkhabela, a HIV-positive sex worker in South Africa, gets antiretroviral drugs delivered to her house as part of a campaign to maintain treatment for HIV-positive patients during the pandemic. A new drug called cabotegravir could give women more options to protect themselves from HIV infection. Bram Janssen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bram Janssen/AP

President-elect Joe Biden's plan to lower the eligibility age for Medicare is popular among voters but is expected to face strong opposition on Capitol Hill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center in north Minneapolis started as part of a 14-city pilot program funded by President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty. It's the only one of those health and social services clinics still in business. Nina Robinson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nina Robinson for NPR

How A Minneapolis Clinic Is Narrowing Racial Gaps In Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/929095585/933754543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript