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Health Care

Since moving into her own place, Rita Stewart says, she feels healthier, supported and hasn't returned to the emergency room. "This is a chance for me to take care of myself better." Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

A demonstrator holds a sign in support of the Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last November. On Thursday, the justices did just that. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Obamacare Wins For The 3rd Time At The Supreme Court

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A sticker reads, "I got vaccinated," at a vaccination site inside Penn Station last month in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

The Houston Methodist hospital system says 178 employees now have until June 21 to complete their COVID-19 vaccinations, or they could be fired. Most of the system's roughly 26,000 employees have complied with the requirement. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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A movie released online by Children's Health Defense, an anti-vaccine group headed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., resurfaces disproven claims about the dangers of vaccines and targets its messages at Black Americans who may have ongoing concerns about racism in medical care. Iryna Veklich/Getty Images hide caption

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Iryna Veklich/Getty Images

An Anti-Vaccine Film Targeted To Black Americans Spreads False Information

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In this 2009 photo, Stephen Cox (left), Mike Forte (center), and Maria Gallo (right), all medical students then, were busy studying a cadaver in the lab at Rocky Vista University's Parker, Colo., campus. Rocky Vista, a for-profit institution, last month received the green light for an accredited satellite campus in Billings, Mont. Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images

Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization is recommending allowing people to mix COVID-19 vaccine doses. Here, people walk past a vaccination clinic this week in Toronto. Zou Zheng/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Zou Zheng/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Half of all the adults in the US have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Each person vaccinated helps fight the pandemic's spread. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Yvette Richards, director of community connection at St. James United Methodist Church in Kansas City, Mo., checks temperatures before Sunday morning services. The church is hosting vaccination clinics and holding socially distanced services after shutting down for much of the pandemic. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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Carlos Moreno/KCUR

In Missouri And Other States, Flawed Data Makes It Hard To Track Vaccine Equity

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Dr. Michelle Wilson just graduated from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University. She will continue her training with a residency in family medicine at Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital in Albany, Ga. Verónica Zaragovia/WLRN hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia/WLRN

Trying To Avoid Racist Health Care, Black Women Seek Out Black Obstetricians

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Truck driver José Mendoza has a Humana HMO plan through his employer. It has a $5,000 deductible and 50% coinsurance, leaving him financially vulnerable. Bryan Cereijo for KHN hide caption

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Bryan Cereijo for KHN

A $10,322 Tab For A Sleep Apnea Study Is Enough To Wreck One Patient's Rest

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In December 2019, Cynthia Carrillo placed her older brother David at Villa Mesa Care Center, a nursing home in Upland, Calif. After the shutdown in March of 2020, Cynthia Carrillo couldn't visit David inside Villa Mesa. One month later, David, 65, who had Down syndrome, died from COVID-19. Chava Sanchez/LAist hide caption

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Chava Sanchez/LAist

In California, Nursing Home Owners Can Operate After They're Denied A License

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Experts hope a new insurance provision included in the recent stimulus package could help stem rising maternal mortality in the U.S. Each year, about 700 American women die due to pregnancy, childbirth or subsequent complications. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

With Black Women At Highest Risk of Maternal Death, Some States Extending Medicaid

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Jacob Balogun, 12, of DC receives a COVID-19 vaccine. Children's National Hospital gave the vaccine to its first batch of 12-15 year old children on May 13. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The State Of Vaccinations In The U.S.

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Last year, in her first year of medical school at Harvard, Pooja Chandrashekar recruited 175 multilingual health profession students from around the U.S. to create simple and accurate fact sheets about COVID-19 in 40 languages. Michele Abercrombie for NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie for NPR

Dr. Michael Maniaci and Dr. Margaret Paulson confer at the Mayo Clinic's hospital-at-home command center in Jacksonville, Florida. Mayo Clinic hide caption

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Mayo Clinic

The Pandemic Proved Hospitals Can Deliver Care To Seriously Ill Patients At Home

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Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center is one of the largest safety-net hospitals in the United States. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospitals Serving The Poor Struggled During COVID. Wealthy Hospitals Made Millions

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This microscope image from the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. Americans should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AP hide caption

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AP

The contents of an overdose rescue kit are displayed in a class on overdose prevention held by non-profit Positive Health Project. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images