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Health Care

Failed Virginia Bill Sparks National Debate About Abortion

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Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., at an Oakland, Calif., campaign rally this week. Harris says she backs a single-payer health system, but she hasn't yet offered details on how she would finance that plan. Mason Trinca/Getty Images hide caption

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Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Anthem Blue Cross of California, one of the state's largest health insurers, is battling Sutter Health over how much it should pay the company's 24 hospitals and 5,000 doctors in Northern California to care for tens of thousands of patients. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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The drugs clonazepam and diazepam are both benzodiazepines; they're better known by the brand names Klonopin and Valium. The drug class also includes Ativan, Librium and Halcion. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Paul Davis, whose daughter, Elizabeth Moreno, was billed $17,850 for a urine test and featured in KHN-NPR's Bill of the Month series, was among the guests invited to the White House on Wednesday to discuss surprise medical bills with President Trump. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

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At an October news conference, the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus called on President Trump to reverse the administration's moves to limit women's access to birth control. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., spoke at the lectern during the event on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Spiegel, a third-year student at New York Medical College, pushed for more education on LGBT health issues for students. Mengwen Cao for NPR hide caption

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Mengwen Cao for NPR

How Much Is That CAT Scan? Now You Can Check (If You Know Billing Codes)

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Demonstrators affiliated with the National Air Traffic Controllers Association protested the federal shutdown at a Capitol Hill rally earlier this month in Washington, D.C. Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images

A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

El Paso Pediatrician Discusses Medical Needs Of Migrant Children In Detention Centers

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Furloughed federal workers protest the ongoing, partial shutdown of the federal government during a non-partisan rally Tuesday at Independence Mall, in Philadelphia. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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