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Health Care

Women participate in a breast cancer fund-raising in Denver in 2011. Despite decades of awareness campaigns, the survival rate for women with metastatic breast cancer hasn't improved. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP

Don't look for leading Ebola researchers at the Sheraton New Orleans. Louisiana health officials told doctors and scientists who have been in West Africa not to come to a medical meeting in town. Prayitno/Flickr hide caption

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Prayitno/Flickr

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

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Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrived by ambulance at Emory University Hospital on Oct. 15. Now healthy, Vinson was discharged from the hospital Tuesday. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Emory Hospital Shares Lessons Learned On Ebola Care

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Home health care workers Jasmine Almodovar (far right) and Artheta Peters (center) take part in a Cleveland rally for higher pay on Sept. 4. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream

Home Health Workers Struggle For Better Pay And Health Insurance

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Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone. Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare hide caption

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Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

In The Hospital, A Bad Translation Can Destroy A Life

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Patients with certain kinds of brain damage can wind up with locked-in syndrome: they may be able to think just fine, but are unable to communicate their thoughts to others. A recently published case study shows that a non-invasive brain-computer interface can help. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

From Brain To Computer: Helping 'Locked-In' Patient Get His Thoughts Out

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A nurse has been quarantined at University Hospital in Newark for the possibility of Ebola has tested negative in a preliminary test, authorities said early this morning. Patti Sapone/NJ Advance Media /Landov hide caption

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Patti Sapone/NJ Advance Media /Landov
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A Diary Of Deaths Reminds Doctor Of Life

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