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Health Care

Anchorage dental hygienist Victoria Cronquist pays $1,600 a month for a health insurance policy that covers four people in her family. Next year, she says, the rate is set to jump to $2,600 a month. Annie Feidt/APRN hide caption

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Annie Feidt/APRN

Steep Hikes In Insurance Rates Force Alaskans To Make Tough Choices

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(Left to right) NYU medical students Brian Chao, Michael Lui, Hye Min Choi, and Varun Vijay take the team approach to learning about the anatomy of cells, and how disease can disrupt them. Analyzing big data sets is now a routine part of their studies, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

Medical Students Crunch Big Data To Spot Health Trends

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Aymara Marchante (from left) and Wiktor Garcia talked with Maria Elena Santa Coloma, an insurance adviser with UniVista Insurance, during February 2015 sign-ups for health plans in Miami, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Obamacare Deploys New Apps, Allies To Persuade The Uninsured

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Dr. Janina Morrison, right, speaks with patient Jorge Colorado and his daughter Margarita Lopez about Colorado's diabetes at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

A young boy talks with Tina Cloer, director of the Children's Bureau, in Indianapolis. The nonprofit shelter takes in children from the state's Department of Child Services when a suitable foster family can't be found. Cloer says the average length of stay at the shelter has increased from two days to 10 in 2015. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Heroin, Opioid Abuse Put Extra Strain On U.S. Foster Care System

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 86 million Americans over age 20 have abnormal blood sugar levels. Over the long run, that can seriously damage the eyes, nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Jeffrey Okonye (left) and Oviea Akpotaire are fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

There Were Fewer Black Men In Medical School In 2014 Than In 1978

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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore's health commissioner, is eager to see hospitals in the city pitch in on public health. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In Maryland, A Change In How Hospitals Are Paid Boosts Public Health

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Former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney struggled to distance himself from the health care program he implemented in Massachusetts. Now he has acknowledged it was a precursor to Obamacare. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Aurora Sinai Medical Center in Milwaukee has found that connecting people with primary care doctors reduces the number of emergency room visits. Courtesy of Aurora Health Care hide caption

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Courtesy of Aurora Health Care

Maryland pharmacist Narender Dhallan often has to decide whether to fill a prescription and lose money or send a customer to another store. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

How Generic Drugs Can Cost Small Pharmacies Big Bucks

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