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Health Care

Moderna protocol files for COVID-19 vaccinations are kept at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. The biotech company has new data reinforcing that its COVID-19 inoculation is safe and effective. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Gets More Good News

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Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (right) tours a temporary hospital site in April with his wife, Maria Lee. The overflow hospital, intended to help with the surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations, won't be able to take patients if there aren't additional doctors and nurses available to provide treatment. Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services hide caption

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Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services

As Hospitals Fill With COVID-19 Patients, Medical Reinforcements Are Hard To Find

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Traveling Crisis Nurse Fears Post-Holiday COVID-19 Surge

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Health Care Workers Plead With Americans To Take Pandemic More Seriously

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Medical staff prepare for an intubation procedure on a COVID-19 patient in a Houston intensive care unit. In some parts of the U.S., as hospitals get crowded, hospital leaders are worried they may need to implement crisis standards of care. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

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Adam Woodrum and his son, Robert, get ready for a bike ride near their home in Carson City, Nev., this month. During the summer, Robert had a bike accident that resulted in a hefty bill from the family's insurer. Maggie Starbard for KHN hide caption

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Maggie Starbard for KHN

A Kid, A Minor Bike Accident And A $19,000 Medical Bill

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A flu vaccine is administered at a walk-up COVID-19 testing site, in San Fernando, Calif. Emergency use authorization is expected soon for vaccines for COVID-19. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals Across U.S. Find Themselves Understaffed, With No Reinforcements Available

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A lab technician sorts blood samples for a COVID-19 vaccination study at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla., on Aug. 13. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Vaccine Expert: Once COVID-19 Vaccine Is Available, 'Don't Overthink It. Don't Wait'

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What It Means When Hospitals Say They Have To Ration Care

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Saint Luke's Hospital of Kansas City is one of the 18 hospitals in the Saint Luke's Health System. Two-thirds of the COVID-19 patients transferred to Saint Luke's from rural areas need intensive care. "We get the sickest of the sick," says Dr. Marc Larsen. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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Carlos Moreno/KCUR

Rural Areas Send Their Sickest Patients To The Cities, Straining Hospital Capacity

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Federal Data Show Growing Hospital Staff Shortages Across The U.S.

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