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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Dr. James Mold, a family physician and author of Achieving Your Personal Health Goals, says doctors should work with their patients to set mutually agreed-upon goals throughout life. Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Inside the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in its earliest days. The clinic opened on June 7, 1967, and treated 250 patients that day. It's motto, then and now: "Health care is a right, not a privilege." Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives

A 1960s 'Hippie Clinic' In San Francisco Inspired A Medical Philosophy

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Deborah and Joe Thompson were married for six years. He died from an accidental heroin overdose in 2016. Todd Hugen Photography hide caption

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Todd Hugen Photography

Opioid Policy Becomes Personal For One Health Official After Husband's Death

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Will Gersch teaches a class as part of a Colorado Kaiser Permanente pain management clinic. John Daley / Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley / Colorado Public Radio

Pain Management Program Offers An Alternative To Opioids

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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Throughout the U.S., minors are generally required to have permission from a parent or legal guardian before they can receive most medical treatment. However, each state has established a number of exceptions. PhotoAttractive/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Some Teen Moms Can't Get The Pain Relief They Choose In Childbirth

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After a long history of civil war and corruption, many Liberians didn't trust their government's attempts to control Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Radio Replay: Don't Panic!

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Kelley Mui helps a client sign up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act on Dec. 15 at the Midwest Asian Health Association in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Food and Drug Administration commissioner, told Kaiser Health News the incentives intended to spur development of drugs for rare diseases deserve a fresh look. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What Happens To Obamacare If Individual Mandate Disappears?

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Some Republicans see HSAs as a great way of helping consumers deal with mounting medical costs. It's still possible a change to the rules governing who can have an HSA and what they are allowed to cover could be added to another bill, some analysts say. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images