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A federal program administered nearly 8 million COVID vaccine doses in nursing homes, reaching the majority of residents. But many staff members chose not to get the shot. Pete Bannan/MediaNews Group/Daily Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Bannan/MediaNews Group/Daily Times via Getty Images

President Biden has vowed to overturn some Trump health policies but hasn't yet attempted to use a powerful tool to do so, the Congressional Review Act. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Janice Chang for NPR and KHN

Her Doctor's Office Moved 1 Floor Up. Why Did Her Treatment Cost 10 Times More?

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Florida's Pasco County Health Department and the Army National Guard partnered with Fellowship Church in Tampa, Fla., to help city residents age 65 and older get immunized with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in February. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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The recently enacted $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill includes around $20 billion to make larger premium subsidies available to consumers who buy qualified Affordable Care Act plans. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxine Toler, who lives near Los Angeles, has been asking neighbors why they do or do not want the vaccine. But it's the health inequities of today, not the infamous "Tuskegee Study," that Toler hears about when she talks to Black friends and neighbors about the COVID-19 vaccine. Heidi de Marco / KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco / KHN

Stop Blaming Tuskegee, Critics Say. It's Not An 'Excuse' For Current Medical Racism

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It's impossible to know how often college students are getting vaccinated. Rumors of it happening illegitimately are widespread, but many situations aren't so duplicitous upon closer examination, because the vaccinated students are actually eligible, because they work in labs or health care settings, or have underlying health issues that make them high risk for severe COVID-19. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Military Medics Tapped To Ramp Up Vaccine Rollout

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Doctors Adapt 'Hamilton' Musical To Encourage Vaccination

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Dr. Hansel Tookes made sure his first dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami on Dec. 15. was televised, as a way to combat hesitancy. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Black And Latinx Americans Are Embracing COVID-19 Vaccination

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Jeremy Leung for NPR

Groceries And Rent Money: Why Support For COVID Isolation Is More Important Than Ever

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"There are not yet enough vaccine doses in Europe to stop the third wave by vaccination alone," German Health Minister Jens Spahn said Friday. Here, a health care worker displays a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in Stuttgart, Germany. Marijan Murat/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marijan Murat/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A woman receives the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Bates Memorial Baptist Church in Louisville, Ky., on Feb. 12. Yet in many states, there are racial disparities in who has received the shot. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Addressing Racial Divides In Health Care Seen As Key To Boosting Black Vaccination

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Many hospitals, including Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif., reported reaching capacity in their ICUs during the winter surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations. These conditions, according to research, may have led to more deaths. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Even with some colleges canceling their midsemester breaks due to COVID-19, students from more than 200 schools are expected to visit Miami Beach during spring break, which runs until mid-April. Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Planning A Spring Break? These 5 Tips Can Help Minimize Risk

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