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A whistleblower lawsuit alleged that two Florida insurance plans inflated fees by making patients appear sicker than they were. Getty Images hide caption

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Poll responses to the question of whether the Senate should pass the American Health Care Act. NPR hide caption

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Poll: Americans Increasingly Think Their Health Care Will Get Worse

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Morning News Brief: Americans Pessimistic About GOP Health Care, U.S.-German Tensions

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Some people using brokers to buy insurance through healthcare.gov will no longer have to go through a multi-step process to enroll. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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French pharmaceutical group Sanofi is expected to receive an exclusive license to market a new Zika vaccine. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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States Fear Price Of New Zika Vaccine Will Be More Than They Can Pay

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Cash-Strapped Seniors Turn To Assisted Living Centers In Mexico

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Handshake-Free Zones Target Spread Of Germs In The Hospital

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Adult ADHD can be difficult to diagnose. Hemant Mehta/IndiaPicture RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Adult ADHD Can't Be Diagnosed With A Simple Screening Test, Doctors Warn

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The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Charmayne Healy (left) and Miranda Kirk (right), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy (center) with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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Nora Saks/MTPR

2 Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

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In Arizona, Doctors Criticize Tightening Of Late Abortion Rules

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Vincent Galvan first went to a nursing home in 2012 after his right leg was amputated. He was evicted after complaining about his care. Mariah Woelfel/WVIK hide caption

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Mariah Woelfel/WVIK

As Nursing Homes Evict Patients, States Question Motives

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