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Dr. Michelle Wilson just graduated from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University. She will continue her training with a residency in family medicine at Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital in Albany, Ga. Verónica Zaragovia/WLRN hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia/WLRN

Trying To Avoid Racist Health Care, Black Women Seek Out Black Obstetricians

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Truck driver José Mendoza has a Humana HMO plan through his employer. It has a $5,000 deductible and 50% coinsurance, leaving him financially vulnerable. Bryan Cereijo for KHN hide caption

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Bryan Cereijo for KHN

A $10,322 Tab For A Sleep Apnea Study Is Enough To Wreck One Patient's Rest

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In December 2019, Cynthia Carrillo placed her older brother David at Villa Mesa Care Center, a nursing home in Upland, Calif. After the shutdown in March of 2020, Cynthia Carrillo couldn't visit David inside Villa Mesa. One month later, David, 65, who had Down syndrome, died from COVID-19. Chava Sanchez/LAist hide caption

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Chava Sanchez/LAist

In California, Nursing Home Owners Can Operate After They're Denied A License

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Experts hope a new insurance provision included in the recent stimulus package could help stem rising maternal mortality in the U.S. Each year, about 700 American women die due to pregnancy, childbirth or subsequent complications. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

With Black Women At Highest Risk of Maternal Death, Some States Extending Medicaid

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Last year, in her first year of medical school at Harvard, Pooja Chandrashekar recruited 175 multilingual health profession students from around the U.S. to create simple and accurate fact sheets about COVID-19 in 40 languages. Michele Abercrombie for NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie for NPR

Dr. Michael Maniaci and Dr. Margaret Paulson confer at the Mayo Clinic's hospital-at-home command center in Jacksonville, Florida. Mayo Clinic hide caption

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Mayo Clinic

The Pandemic Proved Hospitals Can Deliver Care To Seriously Ill Patients At Home

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Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center is one of the largest safety-net hospitals in the United States. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospitals Serving The Poor Struggled During COVID. Wealthy Hospitals Made Millions

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This microscope image from the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. Americans should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AP hide caption

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AP

After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Left: A drawing of a human with a cow head holding a needle menacingly toward a child as he administers a tainted smallpox vaccination was meant to sow distrust of smallpox vaccines. Right: Protesters against COVID-19 vaccinations hold a rally in Sydney in February. Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

Gaylord High School principal Chris Hodges measures the space between seats in a yearbook class. A student in the class tested positive for covid, and Hodges is working with the local health department to trace people who might have been exposed to her at school. Brett Dahlberg/WCMU hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WCMU

A Principal And His Tape Measure: Schools Are Helping Do COVID-19 Contact Tracing

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, at this year's State of the State address in Jefferson City, Mo., when he declared he would "uphold the will of the voters" in expanding Medicaid. He reversed course on Thursday. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP
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Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

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A light micrograph of a mature sporangium of a mucor fungus. India is seeing a rise in cases of mucormycosis, a rare but dangerous fungal infection. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Many of the changes in health care that happened during the pandemic are likely here to stay, such as conferring with doctors online more frequently about medication and other treatments. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images