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Health Care

Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

If you own a small business, a new rule governing association health plans could mean a more affordable health insurance option. But there are some limitations. Asawin Klabma/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Asawin Klabma/EyeEm/Getty Images

In his new job overseeing health coverage for 1.2 million workers and their families, Atul Gawande says he hopes to find specific ways to make health care more efficient and the solutions exportable. Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr hide caption

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Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr

A vaccine given during pregnancy protects the baby against whooping cough, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get it. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

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Samantha Clark/NPR

Reporter John Carreyrou On The 'Bad Blood' Of Theranos

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A young girl waits for care in a medical clinic. A growing number of citizen children of immigrant parents are losing out on Medicaid because their parents fear deportation. Jonathan Kirn/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Kirn/Getty Images

Fearing Deportation, Some Immigrants Opt Out Of Health Benefits For Their Kids

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Dr. Atul Gawande has been picked to lead the high-profile joint venture in health care formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JP Morgan Chase. Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Main Street in McArthur in Vinton County, Ohio. Though the opioid crisis endures in Ohio, the problem is now compounded by the resurgence of methamphetamine addiction. Arezou Rezvani/NPR hide caption

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Arezou Rezvani/NPR

Teachers See the Effects of the Opioid Crisis On Children

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Modern tools of biology could allow someone to recreate a dangerous virus, such as smallpox, from scratch. Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'

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Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Yvette and Scott, both recovering heroin users, now take methadone daily from a clinic in the Southend of Boston. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

After An Overdose, Patients Aren't Getting Treatments That Could Prevent The Next One

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