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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News
Rose Wong for NPR/KHN

A Hospital Charged More Than $700 For Each Push Of Medicine Through Her IV

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After experiencing a suicidal crisis earlier this year, Melinda, a Massachusetts 13-year-old, was forced to remain 17 days in the local hospital's emergency room while she waited for a space to open up at a psychiatric treatment facility. She was only allowed to use her phone an hour a day in the ER; her mom visited daily, bringing books and special foods. Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother

Kids In Mental Health Crisis Can Languish For Days Inside ERs

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Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, leads some of the Biden administration's efforts to expand Medicaid access. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

A person holds a sign to protest at Houston Methodist Hospital in Baytown, Texas, over a policy that says hospital employees must get vaccinated against COVID-19 or lose their jobs. Yi-Chin Lee/AP hide caption

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Yi-Chin Lee/AP

Since moving into her own place, Rita Stewart says, she feels healthier, supported and hasn't returned to the emergency room. "This is a chance for me to take care of myself better." Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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In Health Care, More Money Is Being Spent On Patients' Social Needs. Is It Working?

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A New Obesity Drug Could Help Millions Of Americans. Its Future Hinges On Insurance

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Architect Of The Affordable Care Act Reacts To Supreme Court Upholding The Law

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A demonstrator holds a sign in support of the Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last November. On Thursday, the justices did just that. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Obamacare Wins For The 3rd Time At The Supreme Court

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A sticker reads, "I got vaccinated," at a vaccination site inside Penn Station last month in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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New York City Has Been Slow To Vaccinate Homebound Elderly, Causing More Sickness

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The Houston Methodist hospital system says 178 employees now have until June 21 to complete their COVID-19 vaccinations, or they could be fired. Most of the system's roughly 26,000 employees have complied with the requirement. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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A movie released online by Children's Health Defense, an anti-vaccine group headed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., resurfaces disproven claims about the dangers of vaccines and targets its messages at Black Americans who may have ongoing concerns about racism in medical care. Iryna Veklich/Getty Images hide caption

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Iryna Veklich/Getty Images

An Anti-Vaccine Film Targeted To Black Americans Spreads False Information

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