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Health Care

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Republican Gov. Doug Ducey speaks about a variety of issues during an interview in his office at the Arizona Capitol in May 2018, in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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Wren Vetens was promised a significant discount on the cost of her gender-confirmation surgery if she paid in cash upfront, without using her health insurance. Yet afterward, Vetens received an explanation of benefits saying the hospital had billed her insurer nearly $92,000. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Bill Of The Month: A Plan For Affordable Gender-Confirmation Surgery Goes Awry

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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Describing how pain affects your daily activities may be more effective than the standard pain scale. Lynn Scurfield for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Scurfield for NPR

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

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People walk past tributes to the victims of MH17, placed on signage for the 20th International AIDS Conference in Australia in 2014. Several AIDS activists on their way to the conference were killed. Scott Barbour/Getty Images hide caption

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4 Years After MH17 Downing, Advocates Urge Continued Attention To AIDS Crisis

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Doctors With Disabilities Look For Recognition

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A pharmacy technician prepares syringes containing an injectable anesthetic in the sterile medicines area of the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications

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A sign marks the entrance to a VA Hospital in Hines, Ill. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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VA Whistleblowers 10 Times More Likely Than Peers To Receive Disciplinary Action

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Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Louisiana's New Approach To Treating Hepatitis C

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How Drug Companies Control How Their Drugs Are Covered By Medicaid

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Paul Blow for NPR

Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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