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A medic checks the temperature of a Syrian worshipper before entering the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus to attend Friday prayer on May 15. To try to slow the coronavirus outbreak, the Syrian government has banned mass prayers and asked Syrians to stay home over the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha this weekend. Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images

Director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Francis Collins, holds a model of the coronavirus. This is the sixth vaccine candidate to join Operation Warp Speed's portfolio, and the largest vaccine deal to date. Saul Loeb/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

'It's Very Daunting And Overwhelming': School Nurses On Preparing For The School Year

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Voters in Kirkwood, Mo., cast ballots on Nov. 6, 2018 that helped decide the balance of power in Congress. Next week they'll get the chance to decide whether to expand Medicaid in their state. The measure could extend health coverage to more than 230,000 more Missourians. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Health Workers Say They're Feeling The Strain Due To Coronavirus Outbreak

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Diversity In Coronavirus Vaccine Trials Demanded From Drug Companies

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Healthcare workers talk in the Covid-19 unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas in July. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

In Texas, 2 Big Problems Collide: Uninsured People And An Uncontrolled Pandemic

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Michael Conley, who is deaf, models a mask that has a transparent panel in San Diego on June 3. Face coverings can make communication harder for people who rely on reading lips, and that has spurred a slew of startups and volunteers to make masks with plastic windows. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Demand Surges For See-Through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells

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City In Washington State Drives Hospitalizations Down In Coronavirus Battle

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President Trump speaks during a briefing Tuesday at the White House with a chart showing case fatality rate behind him. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's Favorite Coronavirus Metric, The Case Fatality, Is Unreliable

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Studies Suggest Immunity To The Coronavirus Is Likely To Be Short Term

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Izzy Benasso injured her knee while playing tennis with her father Steve Benasso in Denver. After the college student had knee surgery to repair the injury, her dad noticed her medical bills included a separate one from a surgical assistant for $1,167. Rachel Woolf for KHN hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KHN

The Knee Surgeon Was In-Network. The Surgical Assistant Wasn't, And Billed $1,167

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Dr. Glenn Lopez administered a standard test for the coronavirus to Daniel Contreras at a mobile clinic in South Los Angeles last week. Though highly accurate, such tests can take days or more to process. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Rapid, Cheap, Less Accurate Coronavirus Testing Has A Place, Scientists Say

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