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In 34 states and the District of Columbia, there are religious exemptions to child neglect and abuse laws. That means a parent can deny a child medical care for reasons based on religion. John Fedele/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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John Fedele/Getty Images/Blend Images

How Religion Shapes The Way People Approach Medicine

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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How People With Opioid Addictions Are Treated In Prison

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A visitor to the Harvard School of Public Health's mock safe injection setup checks out the items on the demonstration table set up underneath a tent on the quad near the medical school in Boston on April 30, 2018. Jessica Rinaldi/Getty Images hide caption

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Justice Department Promises Crackdown On Supervised Injection Facilities

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Vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are displayed on a counter at a Walgreens Pharmacy in Mill Valley, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Wren Vetens fought to get her gender confirmation surgery covered after the Group Insurance Board's initial decision left her without insurance coverage. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Without including a "control group" of sepsis patients who get the usual mix of drugs and fluids, even a big study comparing two other experimental approaches won't deliver helpful answers, critics say. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Life-Threatening Heart Attack Leaves Teacher With $108,951 Bill

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As more doctors' offices give patients electronic access to their medical records, both patients and their physicians are asking: Exactly how much of your medical record should you get to see? Runstudio/Getty Images hide caption

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Nationally gathered statistics suggest that nearly half of graduating physicians in 2017 owed more than $200,000 in student debt. Cargo/Getty Images hide caption

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"We would not be able to foster without Medicaid," says Sherri Croom of Tallahassee, Fla. Croom and her husband, Thomas, have fostered 27 children in the past decade. They're pictured here with four adopted children, two 18-year-old former foster daughters and those daughters' sons. Courtesy of the Croom family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Croom family

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, is eager to preserve an expansion of Medicaid that he pushed through, despite opposition from other members of his party. Ron Schwane/AP hide caption

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Ron Schwane/AP

Dispatches From A 'Dopesick' America

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A man holds a sample of the opioid antidote Narcan during a training session at a New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene office in March. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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