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Attorney Marc Scanlon meets with client Kimberly Ledezma at Salud Family Health Centers' clinic in Commerce City, Colo. Every day in this Denver suburb, four lawyers join the clinic's physicians, psychiatrists and social workers to consult on cases, as part of the clinic's philosophy that mending legal ills is as important for health as diet and exercise. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News

Stephanie Rimel looks at a photo of her brother Kyle Dixon, 27, who died of COVID-19 on Jan. 20. She says that during his illness and after his death, some people made insensitive comments or denied the pandemic's reality. Brett Sholtis/WITF hide caption

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Brett Sholtis/WITF

When COVID Deaths Are Dismissed Or Stigmatized, Grief Is Mixed With Shame And Anger

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Danny Reeves, senior pastor at First Baptist Corsicana in Texas, plans to share his experience with COVID-19 with his congregation and encourage everyone who's eligible to get vaccinated. Courtesy of Danny Reeves hide caption

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Courtesy of Danny Reeves

Unvaccinated Pastor Who Almost Died Of COVID Now Preaches The Importance Of Vaccines

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A team at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center in southern Oregon prepares to intubate a COVID-19 patient. Michael Blumhardt/Asante hide caption

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Michael Blumhardt/Asante

Testing your antibody levels to get a sense of your COVID-19 protection may be tempting, especially as you wait for a booster shot. But scientists say these widely available tests can't tell you the full story, at least not yet. Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Antibody Tests Should Not Be Your Go-To For Checking COVID Immunity

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Ely Bair had two medically necessary jaw surgeries. For the first, in 2018, his share of the bill was $3,000. For the second, in 2019 after a job change, he was billed $27,000, even though he had the same insurance carrier. Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News

Same Hospital And Insurer, But The Bill For His 2nd Jaw Procedure Was $24,000 More

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Students head to class this month in Thornton, Colo. Infectious disease experts say the decline in vaccination rates against childhood diseases during the pandemic has increased the potential for outbreaks of diseases once largely vanquished in the United States. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Many Kids Have Missed Routine Vaccines, Worrying Doctors As School Starts

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A Palestinian medic administers a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine during an inoculation campaign at a medical center in Gaza City on Aug. 23. Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

For many Americans who struggle with depression, anxiety or other mood disorders, cost remains a major hurdle to getting treatment, according to a survey published by the National Alliance on Mental Illness. ljubaphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Americans Are Reaching Out For Mental Health Support — But Can't Get It

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Many survivors don't report sexual assaults because they fear no one will believe them. Advocates say better training for police on the neuroscience of trauma could help survivors feel safe while talking with police, making it less likely they experience a secondary trauma. Marissa Espiritu/CapRadio hide caption

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Marissa Espiritu/CapRadio

How Rape Affects Memory And The Brain, And Why More Police Need To Know About This

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Patients with opioid addiction who show up in a hospital's ER face many barriers to recovery, and so do the doctors trying to help them. Easing those barriers on both sides helps patients get into good follow-up programs that lead to lasting change. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

Tourists still stop by to see the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers in Cairo, Ill., where commercial ships dock on the banks. A history of racial tension dating to the Civil War still stings in Cairo. And like many rural towns across the U.S., the community feels underappreciated and misunderstood. Cara Anthony/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Cara Anthony/Kaiser Health News

As COVID-19 Surges, Mississippi Hospital 'Days Away' From Turning Away Patients

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Medicare is funded by a combination of money paid directly to the federal government from paychecks and taxes paid by working Americans. Most dental procedures and tests are not covered under traditional Medicare. Cavan Images/Getty Images hide caption

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