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Cox Medical Center in Branson, Mo., is implementing a personal panic button system for hundreds of its employees. Assaults of hospital staff tripled from 2019 to 2020, the hospital says. Brandei Clifton/Cox Medical Center hide caption

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Brandei Clifton/Cox Medical Center

Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX) introduced the "Cover Now Act" outside the U.S. Capitol on June 17, 2021. The bill intends to close the health insurance gap in Texas and 11 other states that have not expanded Medicaid to uninsured adults. A similar fix is part of the spending bill being debated in Congress this week, and would provide affordable coverage for more than 2.2 million Americans. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Michelle Chester, director of employee health services at Northwell Health, prepares the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at Long Island Jewish Valley Stream hospital. Hospitals and nursing homes across the country are preparing for worsening staff shortages as state deadlines arrive for employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Eduardo Munoz/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/AP

The Vaccine Mandate For Healthcare Workers Means Hospitals Are Losing Staff

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A supporter of pop star Britney Spears participating in a #FreeBritney rally on July 14 in Washington, D.C. When anyone poses a high risk of harm to themselves or others, psychiatrists are obligated to hospitalize them, even against their will. For many patients, paying for that involuntary care leads to long-term financial strain. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Amid Nursing Shortage, Hospital CEO Says Vaccine Mandates Can Deter Staff

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Rural Hospitals Fear A Vaccine Mandate Would Dwindle Already Overextended Staffs

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Evidence seized from a drug trafficking operation in central California in early 2020 included methamphetamine and fentanyl with a street value of $1.5 million, authorities said. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP

Methamphetamine Deaths Soar, Hitting Black And Native Americans Especially Hard

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Wilma Banks, who lives in the neighborhood of New Orleans East, sits on her bed next to her nebulizer and CPAP machine. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, when much of New Orleans was left without power, she wasn't able to power up the medical devices and had only her limited supply of inhalers to widen her airways. Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica hide caption

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Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica

Entergy Resisted Upgrading New Orleans' Power Grid. Residents Paid The Price

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Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appears before a Senate committee in July. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP

The FDA Has Been Without A Permanent Leader For 8 Months As COVID Cases Climb

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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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According to the State Department, 14 au pair agencies operate in the U.S. These private companies are required to offer the child care workers who contract with them basic health coverage. But the plans often amount to emergency or travel insurance — not the kind of full coverage ACA health plans offer. Petri Oeschger/Getty Images hide caption

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Petri Oeschger/Getty Images

Charlie Callagan's bone marrow transplant for multiple myeloma was recently postponed at the last minute because Oregon hospitals are overwhelmed with treating COVID-19 patients. Erik Neumann / Jefferson Public Radio hide caption

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Erik Neumann / Jefferson Public Radio

Overwhelmed With COVID Patients, Oregon Hospitals Postpone Surgeries And Cancer Care

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