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Susan Nelson, author and public speaker on brain injury awareness and gun safety, at her home in Austin, Texas. Nelson survived a point-blank gunshot to the head in 1993. Gabriel C. Perez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Perez/KUT

Texas Disability Group Wants Victims' Voices Heard In Gun Debate

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Catherine Fitzgerald, the author's mother, spent four nights in a hospital after falling in her home. But Medicare refused to pay for her rehab care, saying she had only been an inpatient for one night. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Ogechi Ukachu, one of the registered nurses recently hired to help staff D.C.'s "Right Care Right Now" program, takes a training call at the city's 911 call center. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

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Maryland's overturned law restricted the price of generic drugs, and had been hailed as a model for other states. It's one of a number of state initiatives designed to combat rapidly rising drug prices. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Mice may be adorable, but the droppings and the bacteria they contain, not so much. Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images

New York City Mice Carry Bacteria That Can Make People Sick

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Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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The drug test developed by Aegis Sciences checks urine samples to help doctors determine if their patients are taking their blood pressure medicine. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Drug Test Spurs Frank Talk Between Hypertension Patients And Doctors

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New Medicaid Requirements Signals Trump Crackdown On Public Assistance Programs

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University of Puget Sound chemist Dan Burgard keeps a freezer full of archived samples from two wastewater treatment plants in western Washington in case he needs to rerun the samples or analyze a specific drug he didn't test for the first time. Dan Burgard hide caption

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Dan Burgard

Under current law, Medicare requires patients to get a referral before seeing an audiologist to diagnose hearing loss. Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images

Extreme lack of attention is not unusual in hospitals in poor countries, says Martin Onyango, legal advisor for the Center for Reproductive Rights based in Nairobi. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

At a recent National LGBTQ Task Force conference in Washington D.C., Luis Felipe Cebas (right) from Whitman-Walker Health, talks with Sarah Fleming about PrEP, the pre-exposure drug that can help protect against HIV infection. Tyrone Turner/ WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/ WAMU

PrEP Campaign Aims To Block HIV Infection And Save Lives In D.C.

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