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"The biggest challenge for me was to see how I would be a father again," says Dr. Naveed Khan, who was injured while driving an all-terrain vehicle. "With two able-bodied parents at home, it was easier." Shelby Knowles for NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for NPR

Taken For A Ride: M.D. Injured In ATV Crash Gets $56,603 Bill For Air Ambulance Trip

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Jean Couch, 75, perches on the edge of a chair at her home in Los Altos Hills, Calif. She teaches people the art of sitting in chairs without back pain. Erin Brethauer for NPR hide caption

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Erin Brethauer for NPR

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do

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Jill Biden Talks Biden Cancer Initiative

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Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

VA Will Try Again To Make Its Health Records Compatible With Pentagon's

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"If you do say, 'Yes, my child has seen a counselor or a therapist or a psychologist,' what does the school then do with that?" asks Laura Goodhue, who has a 9-year-old son on the autism spectrum and a 10-year-old son who has seen a psychologist. Andrea D'Aquino for NPR hide caption

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Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

Parents Are Leery Of Schools Requiring 'Mental Health' Disclosures By Students

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Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Physicians face long hours, frustrating paperwork and sometimes difficult patients. But researchers aren't so clear on whether burnout is the right word to describe their problems. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Health insurers who offer Medicare Advantage plans have permission to soon require patients to try less expensive alternatives to some before receiving pricier drugs. Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images hide caption

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Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Despite abuse deterrent formulation, Purdue Pharma's OxyContin continues to be used by some people with opioid addiction to get high. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Insurer To Purdue Pharma: We Won't Pay For OxyContin Anymore

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