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There are several ways older adults can get free rapid antigen tests, but Medicare will not reimburse them when they purchase them. Frederic J. Brown /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown /AFP via Getty Images

Dhaval Bhatt plays Monopoly with his children, Hridaya (left) and Martand, at their home in St. Peters, Missouri. Martand's mother took him to a children's hospital in April after he burned his hand, and the bill for the emergency room visit was more than $1,000 — even though the child was never seen by a doctor. Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News

The doctor didn't show up, but the hospital ER still billed $1,012

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A medical ethicist weighs in on how to approach treating unvaccinated people

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People attend the March for Life rally on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The march, in its 49th year, comes as a Supreme Court decision on abortion rights could unravel Roe v. Wade. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Demonstrators gathered in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices heard arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health, a case about a Mississippi law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks, on December 01, 2021. Experts believe a ruling on this case could undermine or overturn Roe v. Wade. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

May Nast arrives for dinner at RiverWalk, an independent senior housing facility, in New York, April 1, 2021. COVID-19 infections are soaring again at U.S. nursing homes because of the omicron wave, and deaths are climbing too. That's leading to new restrictions on family visits and a renewed push to get more residents and staff members vaccinated and boosted. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A photo of Tony Tsantinis hangs in a collage set up for a celebration of his life on the final day that Athens Pizza in Brimfield, Mass., was open for business. Tsantinis, who owned the pizzeria for many years, died of COVID-19 last month when efforts to find space at a hospital that could offer him a higher level of care could not be found. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

17 hospitals had no room for this COVID patient. He later died waiting for dialysis

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President Biden speaks about the government's COVID-19 response on Thursday. Experts say his administration's efforts have yielded mixed results in the first year Biden's been in office. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A year in, experts assess Biden's hits and misses on handling the pandemic

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The Red Cross says the supply of blood for medical use is dangerously low

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How health workers are getting through the day in the face of surging COVID cases

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As demand for testing ramps up, community clinics and nonprofits struggle to keep up with the need. These groups have run testing sites throughout the pandemic in low-income and minority neighborhoods, like this one in the Mission District of San Francisco, Calif., from UCSF and the Latino Task Force. David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More Black students are headed to medical school, but finances are still a major issue

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A phlebotomist tends to a blood donor during the Starts, Stripes, and Pints blood drive event in Louisville, Ky., in July. Rising numbers of organ transplants, trauma cases, and elective surgeries postponed by the COVID-19 pandemic have caused an increase in the need for blood products. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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People and cars line up outside Boston Medical Center near the emergency room, where COVID-19 testing was taking place, on Jan. 3. Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images