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Shots - Health News

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Workers at a family planning health center get emotional as thousands of abortion rights advocates march past their clinic on their way into downtown Chicago on May 14, 2022. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Some clinics are bracing for a huge influx of patients if Roe v. Wade is overturned

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Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

Nurse educator Katie Demelis and nurse manager Nydia White wrap the the body of a patient who died of COVID-19 at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., on April 15, 2020. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images

First grader Rihanna Chihuaque, 7, receives a COVID-19 vaccine at Arturo Velasquez Institute in Chicago last November. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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FDA authorizes first COVID booster for children ages 5 to 11

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The memory of aging mice improved when they received a substance found in the spinal fluid of young animals. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

A substance found in young spinal fluid helps old mice remember

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With Roe v. Wade primed to be overruled, people seeking abortions could soon face new barriers in many states. Researcher Diana Greene Foster documented what happens when someone is denied an abortion in The Turnaway Study. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one

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RaDonda Vaught listens to victim impact statements during her sentencing in Nashville. She was found guilty in March of criminally negligent homicide and gross neglect of an impaired adult after she accidentally administered the wrong medication. Nicole Hester/AP hide caption

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Nicole Hester/AP

Christina and James Summers were married for 17 years. Now, she's learning to navigate life without him. "Me and my husband really worked like a team," she says. "My teammate's not here to help me, so I'm really feeling a single mom vibe, just trying to get accustomed to this." Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

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Rosem Morton for NPR

COVID took many in the prime of life, leaving families to pick up the pieces

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Koko Nakajima/NPR

This is how many lives could have been saved with COVID vaccinations in each state

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Containers of pills and prescription drugs are boxed for disposal during the Drug Enforcement Administration's 20th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 24, 2021. Nearly 108,000 people died in 2021 from drug overdoses. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Overdose deaths continued to rise in 2021, reaching historic highs

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West Hansen's role is to inform people of the government benefits and services they can access, including the coronavirus vaccine. But many of his clients distrust the needle. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

The number of Americans who say they won't get a COVID shot hasn't budged in a year

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An attendee holds her child during A Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7. Recently passed laws make abortion illegal after about six weeks into a pregnancy. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Pews were marked off to encourage social distancing at a funeral home in Temple, Penn., in March of 2021, around the time the Delta variant began to take hold in the United States. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Few eligible families have sought federal payment of COVID funeral expenses

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The Michigan State Capitol building is seen on Oct. 8, 2020, in Lansing. A Michigan law from 1931 would make abortion a felony in the state if the Roe v. Wade decision is overturned. Rey Del Rio/Getty Images hide caption

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Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

A Michigan law from 1931 would make abortion a felony if Roe falls

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Jon Miller sits in his bedroom with his dog, Carlos, whom he received as a present for successfully completing cancer treatment a decade ago. Miller sustained severe brain damage, and requires the help of home health aides to continue living in his home. Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media

Retiree Donna Weiner shows some of the daily prescription medications for which she pays more than $6,000 per year through a Medicare prescription drug plan. She supports giving Medicare authority to negotiate drug prices. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP
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