Shots - Health News NPR's online health program.

Jean Couch, 75, perches on the edge of a chair at her home in Los Altos Hills, Calif. She teaches people the art of sitting in chairs without back pain. Erin Brethauer for NPR hide caption

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Erin Brethauer for NPR

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do

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Of parents who tell pollsters their teens have trouble sleeping, 23 percent say the kids are waking up at night worried about their social lives. A third are worried about school. All-night access to electronic devices only aggravates the problem, sleep scientists say. 3photo/Getty Images hide caption

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3photo/Getty Images

Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

"If you do say, 'Yes, my child has seen a counselor or a therapist or a psychologist,' what does the school then do with that?" asks Laura Goodhue, who has a 9-year-old son on the autism spectrum and a 10-year-old son who has seen a psychologist. Andrea D'Aquino for NPR hide caption

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Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

Parents Are Leery Of Schools Requiring 'Mental Health' Disclosures By Students

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Drinking water samples from homes in southwestern Puerto Rico are tested at Interamerican University of Puerto Rico in San German. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Puerto Rico's Tap Water Often Goes Untested, Raising Fears About Lead Contamination

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Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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The fix was in for this rhesus macaque drinking juice on the Ganges River in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. No gambling was required to get the reward. Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM hide caption

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Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

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Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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A Swiss study tracking the health of a group of children conceived via assisted reproductive technology found that a surprising number developed premature aging of their blood vessels. Now in their teens, 15 percent have hypertension. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Debenport/Getty Images

Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Physicians face long hours, frustrating paperwork and sometimes difficult patients. But researchers aren't so clear on whether burnout is the right word to describe their problems. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Nearly 62 percent of respondents had at least one ACE and a quarter reported three or more. The remaining respondents had at least two ACEs, including 16 percent with four or more such experiences. Elva Etienne/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Baker (left) of Papa & Barkley Co., a Cannabis company based in Eureka, Calif., shows Shirley Avedon of Laguna Woods different products intended to help with pain relief. Stephanie O'Neill for NPR hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for NPR

Ticket To Ride: Pot Sellers Put Seniors On The Canna-Bus

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Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Daily low-dose aspirin can be of help to older people with an elevated risk for a heart attack. But for healthy older people, the risk outweighs the benefit. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

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Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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A government research project to assess the safety of BPA is beginning to show results. T-pool/STOCK4B/Getty Images hide caption

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T-pool/STOCK4B/Getty Images

Government Study Of BPA Backs Its Safety, But Doesn't Settle Debate

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