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Shots - Health News

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In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Using fluorescent antibody-based stains and advanced microscopy, researchers are able to visualize cells of different species origins in an early stage chimeric embryo. The red color indicates the cells of human origin. Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology hide caption

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Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey

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Hartsville, Tenn., resident Rick Bradley, 62, received his first COVID-19 vaccine dose in late March at a local Walgreens, saying, "This is not a summer cold or a conspiracy." He says some neighbors have become so used to COVID-19 that getting vaccinated has fallen off the priority list. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

'It's Not A Never Thing' — White, Rural Southerners Hesitant To Get COVID Vaccine

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Syphilis cases in California have contributed to soaring national caseloads of sexually transmitted diseases. Experts point to the advent of dating apps, less condom use and an increase in meth. Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Once On The Brink Of Eradication, Syphilis Is Raging Again

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A mass vaccination site at the Lumen Field Event Center in Seattle had plenty of takers for the COVID-19 vaccine when it opened in mid-March. Though some relatively rare cases of coronavirus infection have been documented despite vaccination, "I don't see anything that changes our concept of the vaccine and its efficacy," says Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated

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New York state is developing Excelsior Pass in partnership with IBM to provide digital proof of a COVID-19 vaccination. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden's nearly $2 trillion proposal to support U.S. jobs and infrastructure includes $400 billion to fund the kinds of home-based, long-term health care services and aides that many families have, until now, found unaffordable. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Missouri state lawmakers are debating whether to fund an expansion of Medicaid that would bring health coverage to 275,000 more people in the state. The expansion was enshrined in a constitutional amendment approved by voters. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Deaths from COVID-19 are often due to the immune system overreacting to the coronavirus. New drugs to suppress that reaction are showing promise, say researchers. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise

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Nearly a third of adults in the U.S. have gotten at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, but researchers warn that vaccine refusal may keep the country from reaching herd immunity. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

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As the U.S. races to vaccinate its population, the development of better COVID-19 vaccines has already begun. Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand via Agence France-Presse/Getty Images hide caption

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Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand via Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

Scientists Race To Develop Next Generation Of COVID Vaccines

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Sonia Sein with her surgeons and ICU team at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Claudia Paul/Mount Sinai Health System hide caption

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Claudia Paul/Mount Sinai Health System

Woman Gets New Windpipe In Groundbreaking Transplant Surgery

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Vinessa Kirkwood, who lives in northwestern Indiana, said she's had to cancel appointments at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis for her 20-month-old son, Donte, because she can't afford to pay for lodging. Christina Kirkwood hide caption

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Christina Kirkwood

A male bonobo at Lola yo Bonobo sanctuary. Only about 20,000 wild bonobos are left, and they are found only in the central rainforests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

A new study finds that COVID-19 vaccines produce effective levels of antibodies in pregnant and breastfeeding women. They may benefit babies as well. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

A sign requiring face masks and COVID-19 protocols is displayed at a restaurant in Plymouth, Mich., on March 21. Coronavirus cases in Michigan are skyrocketing after months of steep declines, one sign that a new surge may be starting. Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A study of mice that hear imaginary sounds could help explain human disorders like schizophrenia, which produce hallucinations. D-Keine/Getty Images hide caption

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D-Keine/Getty Images

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People

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Shots - Health News

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