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Shots - Health News

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The drugmaker Amylyx is asking the FDA to approve a new medication for ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. It's possible the agency could greenlight the drug by the end of the month. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

FDA seems poised to approve a new drug for ALS, but does it work?

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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A pharmacist prepares to administer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the Southwest Senior Center on September 09, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

How Biden's declaring the pandemic 'over' complicates efforts to fight COVID

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Writer and health educator Marni Sommer is co-author of A Girl's Guide to Puberty & Periods, which aims to help young people ages 9 to 14 understand the changes that happen in puberty and what to expect when. Grow & Know/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Grow & Know/Screenshot by NPR

A pharmacy in New York City offers vaccines for COVID-19 and flu. Some researchers argue that the two diseases may pose similar risks of dying for those infected. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu

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President Biden speaks during an event Tuesday celebrating the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act on the South Lawn of the White House. The new law gives Medicare the power to negotiate drug prices. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Margaret Davis (left) and Delisa Williams (right) became acquainted when they moved into the Salvation Army Center of Hope shelter, just outside Charlotte, N.C. Both women receive federal benefits, but the monthly amounts aren't high enough for them to be able to rent an apartment. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

Screening mammograms, like this one in Chicago in 2012, are among a number of preventive health services the Affordable Care Act has required health plans to cover at no charge to patients. But that could change, if the Sept. 7 ruling by a federal district judge in Texas is upheld on appeal. Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Volunteers deliver water and other items to the homeless in Los Angeles. Poverty rates dropped in 2021 thanks in part to pandemic policy measures, but poverty advocates fear they will rise again without those measures in place. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Poverty and uninsured rates drop, thanks to pandemic-era policies

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Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, White House Monkeypox response deputy coordinator, speaks during a press briefing at the White House, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022, in Washington. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Even though the sisters hope a successful drug treatment for their family's form of dementia will emerge, they're now planning for a future without one. "There's a kind of sorrow about Alzheimer's disease that, as strange as it seems, there's a comfort in being in the presence of people who understand it," Ward says. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene

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A bookmark advertising the 988 suicide and crisis lifeline emergency telephone number displayed by a volunteer with the Natrona County Suicide Prevention Task Force, in Casper, Wyoming on August 14, 2022. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Workers typically rely on plastic hard hat styles designed in the 1960s. But newer technology does a better job at protecting brains, especially from oblique impact caused by falls. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

How a new hard hat technology can protect workers better from concussion

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After a hospital stay, many patients are surveyed to weigh in on how good their experience was. Survey results can affect how much hospitals get paid. But instances of racial or other discrimination are not covered in the surveys. David Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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David Sacks/Getty Images

A third-grader punches in her student identification to pay for a meal at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. During the pandemic, schools were able to offer free school meals to all children regardless of need. Now advocates want to make that policy permanent. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP

The new COVID boosters rolling out this month represent a shift in strategy, said White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha during a press briefing. The goal now will likely be to roll out new boosters annually. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The new COVID booster could be the last you'll need for a year, federal officials say

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Gearing up for fall, health officials are recommending a new round of booster shots. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

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Shots - Health News

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