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Shots - Health News

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The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 12-0, with one recusal, to recommend the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for people aged 18 and older. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Restrictions on public gatherings and indoor dining, as well as improved rates of mask-wearing and social distancing helped bring down the rate of new coronavirus infections in the U.S. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Hofstra University student Divya Singh found herself beset by a double whammy of bills from two of the costliest kinds of institutions in America — colleges and hospitals. After experiencing anxiety when her family had trouble coming up with the money for her tuition, she sought counseling and ended up with a weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital — and a resulting $3,413 bill. Jackie Molloy for KHN hide caption

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Jackie Molloy for KHN

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

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Vaccine makers are moving to test booster shots, prompted by new coronavirus variants that have sprung up in South Africa, the U.K. and elsewhere. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in partnership with Boston Children's Hospital and Castlight Health launched a new tool that allows Americans to search for COVID-19 vaccine providers with stock of vaccine where they live. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

CDC Launches Web Tool To Help Americans Find COVID-19 Vaccines

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Sepsis, which is sometimes called blood poisoning, is essentially the body's overreaction to an infection. Kateryna Kon/Science Source hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Source

Vitamin C Fails Again As Treatment For Sepsis

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Xavier Becerra, President Biden's nominee for secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, contended with critics of abortion rights on the first day of his confirmation hearings Tuesday. Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Rochelle Walensky likens the call she got from the Biden team, asking her to lead the CDC amid a pandemic, to a hospital alarm that goes off when a patient's heart has stopped. "I got called during a code," she says. "And when you get called during a code, your job is to be there to help." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Biden's Straight-Talking CDC Director Has Long Used Data To Save Lives

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At a Kedren Community Health Center vaccine clinic in South Central Los Angeles this month, 89-year-old Cecilia Onwytalu (center) signals she's more than ready to get her immunization against COVID-19. Apu Gomes/Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/Getty Images

Race Versus Time: Targeting Vaccine To The Most Vulnerable Is No Speedy Task

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On Jan. 19, the incoming Biden administration hosted memorial to lives lost to COVID-19 at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. Since then another 100,000 Americans have died. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jodee Pineau-Chaisson sits in her office in Springfield, Mass., on Jan. 12. Pineau-Chaisson, a social worker, contracted the coronavirus last May and continues to have symptoms even months after testing negative for the virus. Meredith Nierman/GBH News hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/GBH News

When Does COVID-19 Become A Disability? 'Long-Haulers' Push For Answers And Benefits

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Leyda Valentine, a research coordinator, takes blood from Lisa Taylor as she participates in a COVID-19 vaccination study at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla., in August 2020. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Long-Term Studies Of COVID-19 Vaccines Hurt By Placebo Recipients Getting Immunized

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How do you get a COVID-19 vaccine appointment? The answer varies by state. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

How To Sign Up For A COVID-19 Vaccine In Your State

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Nurse Modesta Littleman vaccinates patient Peter Sulewski in late January, on the first day of vaccinations at a clinic run by Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Vaccinating Homeless Patients Against COVID-19: 'All Bets Are Off'

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Nurse Keith Grant got his second dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine on schedule from registered nurse Valerie Massaro in January at the Hartford Convention Center — 21 days after his first immunization. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccine: Don't Miss 2nd Dose Because Of Scheduling Glitches

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The federal health insurance exchange, HealthCare.gov, has reopened until May 15 for new sign-ups; you can also switch to a different health plan on the exchange. But some states that run their own health insurance marketplaces have different rules. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tom Sweitzer hosts a weekly music therapy group via Zoom for other COVID-19 survivors dealing with lingering symptoms. "We get to know each other through the music," says one participant. "I think that was a really intuitive and wonderful way to connect us." Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Music Therapy Brings Solace To COVID-19 Patients And Healers

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Lots of manufacturers offer a rainbow of ink colors. People can even go online and order a bottle. The Food and Drug Administration has not regulated the pigments in tattoo inks so far, but agency officials will investigate and recall tattoo inks if they hear of a specific safety concern, like bacterial contamination that could lead to infections. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

What's In Tattoo Ink? Why Scientists Want To Know

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