Your Health : Shots - Health News There's never been more information about how to live a healthy life, yet the goal sometimes seems impossible to reach. We sort through the latest news on how to eat better, live longer and stay well.

If you like sudoku, go ahead and play. But staying sharp means using many parts of your brain. Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images

A Brain Scientist Who Studies Alzheimer's Explains How She Stays Mentally Fit

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"The biggest challenge for me was to see how I would be a father again," says Dr. Naveed Khan, who was injured while driving an all-terrain vehicle. "With two able-bodied parents at home, it was easier." Shelby Knowles for NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for NPR

Taken For A Ride: M.D. Injured In ATV Crash Gets $56,603 Bill For Air Ambulance Trip

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Jean Couch, 75, perches on the edge of a chair at her home in Los Altos Hills, Calif. She teaches people the art of sitting in chairs without back pain. Erin Brethauer for NPR hide caption

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Erin Brethauer for NPR

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do

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Of parents who tell pollsters their teens have trouble sleeping, 23 percent say the kids are waking up at night worried about their social lives. A third are worried about school. All-night access to electronic devices only aggravates the problem, sleep scientists say. 3photo/Getty Images hide caption

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3photo/Getty Images

Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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Daily low-dose aspirin can be of help to older people with an elevated risk for a heart attack. But for healthy older people, the risk outweighs the benefit. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

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A government research project to assess the safety of BPA is beginning to show results. T-pool/STOCK4B/Getty Images hide caption

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Government Study Of BPA Backs Its Safety, But Doesn't Settle Debate

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A 17-year-old male bonobo eats while his son watches in the Lola Ya Bonobo Sanctuary, Democratic Republic of Congo. Fiona Rogers/Getty Images hide caption

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What's Mine Is Yours, Sort Of: Bonobos And The Tricky Evolutionary Roots Of Sharing

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Laura Randall, pictured at Mill Pond Park in Portland, gives her son, Matthew Randall, 7, a lot of freedom to explore on his own. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

To Raise Confident, Independent Kids, Some Parents Are Trying To 'Let Grow'

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Courtesy of G. P. Putnam's Sons

'Gross Anatomy' Turns Humor On Taboos About The Female Body

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Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

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