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Shots - Health News

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People participate in a mass yoga session on International Yoga Day in Times Square on June 21, 2023 in New York City. The CDC finds about 1 in 6 adults in the U.S. practice yoga. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A proposed new rule would ban medical debt from credit reports. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Medical debt announcement

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Eating a low-carb diet, or the low FODMAP diet, can help with IBS symptoms, a new study finds. d3sign/Getty Images/Moment RF hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images/Moment RF

Zepbound is one of several new drugs that people are using successfully to lose weight. But shortages have people strategizing how to maintain their weight loss when they can't get the drug. Shelby Knowles/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/Bloomberg via Getty Images

GOING OFF OBESITY DRUGS

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopment disorders among children. SIphotography/Getty Images hide caption

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SIphotography/Getty Images

Father and son are now caregiver and care recipient. Robert Turner, Sr. was cheerful even though his day started with being discharged from the hospital. Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Black men are a hidden segment of caregivers. It's stressful but rewarding, too

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On the last full day of a Bahamas excursion, Vincent Wasney had three epileptic seizures. While being evacuated, he received a bill for expenses incurred during the cruise. Kristen Norman for KFF Health News hide caption

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Kristen Norman for KFF Health News

He fell ill on a cruise. Before he boarded the rescue boat, they handed him the bill

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A large new study shows people who bike have less knee pain and arthritis than those who do not. PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images hide caption

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PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images

Like to bike? Your knees will thank you and you may live longer, too

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Traveling internationally with a dog — or adopting one from abroad — just got a bit more complicated. The CDC issued new rules intended to reduce the risk of importing rabies. mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The new guidelines were prompted by increased rates of breast cancer in women in their 40s. They recommend mammograms every other year, starting at age 40. izusek/Getty Images hide caption

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izusek/Getty Images

Mammograms should start at age 40, new guidelines recommend

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When he arranged to undergo top surgery, Cass Smith-Collins of Las Vegas selected a surgeon touted as an early developer of the procedure who does not contract with insurance. "I had one shot to get the chest that I should have been born with, and I wasn't going to chance it to someone who was not an expert at his craft," he says. Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News/Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News/Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News

Sign here? Financial agreements may leave doctors in the driver's seat

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Climbing stairs is a good way to get quick bursts of aerobic exercise, says cardiologist Dr. Carlin Long. lingqi xie/Getty Images hide caption

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lingqi xie/Getty Images

Elevator or stairs? Your choice could boost longevity, study finds

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Katie Krimitsos is among the majority of American women who have trouble getting healthy sleep, according to a new Gallup survey. Krimitsos launched a podcast called Sleep Meditation for Women to offer some help. Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos hide caption

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Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos
Lily Padula for NPR

Gay people often have older brothers. Why? And does it matter?

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