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Shots - Health News

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The new COVID boosters rolling out this month represent a shift in strategy, said White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha during a press briefing. The goal now will likely be to roll out new boosters annually. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The new COVID booster could be the last you'll need for a year, federal officials say

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Gearing up for fall, health officials are recommending a new round of booster shots. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

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A heat wave is smothering much of the Western region including Los Angeles. Worrisome weather trends like this can contribute to climate stress. Eric Thayer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. food system makes junk food plentiful and cheap. Eating a diet based on whole foods like fresh fruit and vegetables can promote health - but can also strain a tight grocery budget. Food leaders are looking for ways to improve how Americans eat. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

This computer-generated image shows the formation of a zygote after fertilization. Some Republican-led states, including Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, and Oklahoma, have passed laws declaring that life begins at fertilization, a contention that opens the door to a host of pregnancy-related litigation. Anatomical Travelogue/Science Source hide caption

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Anatomical Travelogue/Science Source

Dani Yuengling of Conway, South Carolina, knew she had to follow up after a mammogram found a lump. Her mom had died of breast cancer. But she had no idea how expensive the biopsy would be. Gavin McIntyre for KHN hide caption

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Gavin McIntyre for KHN

An $18,000 biopsy? Paying cash might have been cheaper than using her insurance

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The Biden administration plans to offer updated booster shots in the fall. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Summer boosters for people under 50 shelved in favor of updated boosters in the fall

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DELRAY, FL - MAY 23, 2022: (L-R) Alexandra Iriarte, Elizabeth George, Janaya Stephens, Paris Jackson, Mario Guillaume and Keanna Tyson during a group session in their grief support group also knows as Steve's Club held during school hours at Atlantic High School in Delray Beach, Florida on May 23, 2022. Saul Martinez for NPR hide caption

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Saul Martinez for NPR

Losing a parent can derail teens' lives. A high school grief club aims to help

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Ivermectin has developed an enormous following over the course of the pandemic – in part because of a small cadre of fringe doctors who promote it as an alternative to COVID vaccines, despite early studies which didn't support it as a treatment. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Doubting mainstream medicine, COVID patients find dangerous advice and pills online

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Oona Tempest/KHN

How to get rid of medical debt — or avoid it in the first place

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A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines will soon be available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The omicron variant, though much more contagious than the delta strain, is still prevalent in the U.S. but is less likely than delta to cause long COVID, according to a new study. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Omicron poses about half the risk of long COVID as delta, new research finds

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A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., in November 2021. A committee of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended Wednesday that the agency expand authorization of COVID-19 vaccines to children as young as 6-months-old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Advisers to the FDA back COVID vaccines for the youngest children

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This hybrid bull, which lives on the A&K Ranch near Raymondville, Mo., will be part of the process to create beefalo that are 37.5% bison, the magic number for the best beefalo meat. Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media

Nineteen children and two adults were killed during the shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Parents are struggling to cope with the loss and with how to explain it to their children. Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Linda Munson's youngest grandson, Daniel Gomez, 2, tries on an Oculus headset in her yard in Berlin, Conn. Playing different virtual reality games has become her family's regular Sunday activity, Munson said. Yehyun Kim for NPR hide caption

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Yehyun Kim for NPR

Nurse educator Katie Demelis and nurse manager Nydia White wrap the the body of a patient who died of COVID-19 at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., on April 15, 2020. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images

Travelers sit in a waiting area at Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport in Providence, R.I., on April 19. A federal judge's decision to strike down the federal mask mandate has left travelers to assess the risks of public transit on their own. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP
Shots - Health News

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