Your Health : Shots - Health News There's never been more information about how to live a healthy life, yet the goal sometimes seems impossible to reach. We sort through the latest news on how to eat better, live longer and stay well.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Your Health

Traveling internationally with a dog — or adopting one from abroad — just got a bit more complicated. The CDC issued new rules intended to reduce the risk of importing rabies. mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
mauinow1/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The new guidelines were prompted by increased rates of breast cancer in women in their 40s. They recommend mammograms every other year, starting at age 40. izusek/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
izusek/Getty Images

Mammograms should start at age 40, new guidelines recommend

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247941059/1248403530" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When he arranged to undergo top surgery, Cass Smith-Collins of Las Vegas selected a surgeon touted as an early developer of the procedure who does not contract with insurance. "I had one shot to get the chest that I should have been born with, and I wasn't going to chance it to someone who was not an expert at his craft," he says. Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News/Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News/Bridget Bennett for KFF Health News

Sign here? Financial agreements may leave doctors in the driver's seat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247881082/1248014508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Climbing stairs is a good way to get quick bursts of aerobic exercise, says cardiologist Dr. Carlin Long. lingqi xie/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
lingqi xie/Getty Images

Elevator or stairs? Your choice could boost longevity, study finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247532191/1247741725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Katie Krimitsos is among the majority of American women who have trouble getting healthy sleep, according to a new Gallup survey. Krimitsos launched a podcast called Sleep Meditation for Women to offer some help. Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos
Lily Padula for NPR

Gay people often have older brothers. Why? And does it matter?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243861703/1244900628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The author's 8-year-old daughter, Rosy, has a "kids' license," showing she has her parents' permission to ride her bike around her Texas hometown. Michaeleen Doucleff hide caption

toggle caption
Michaeleen Doucleff

While not an official holiday, National Siblings Day on April 10 has gained momentum on social media in recent years. Diana Haronis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Diana Haronis/Getty Images

National Siblings Day is a celebration born of love — and grief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243733223/1243989429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At left, Zion Kelly holds a photo of his late twin brother Zaire Kelly. At right, Zion keeps this framed photo of he and his brother on the desk in his bedroom. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dee Dwyer for NPR

A gunman stole his twin from him. This is what he's learned about grieving a sibling

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243529775/1243825578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lily Padula for NPR

Blended families are common. Here are tips to help stepsiblings get along

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239477262/1242328592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sibling Coffee Roasters owner Libby Powell poses with her brother, Benjamin Withem, outside her West Virginia coffee shop. In her hand is an early photo of the pair — one they are trying to re-create. Susana Raab/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Susana Raab/for NPR

At the heart of this cozy coffee shop lies a big sister's love for her little brother

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240796055/1242196851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

About two months after undergoing open-heart surgery, Sara England's infant son, Amari Vaca, was sick and struggling to breathe. Staff members at a local medical center in Salinas, California, arranged for him to be transferred to a different hospital via air ambulance. Kevin Painchaud/Kevin Painchaud hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Painchaud/Kevin Painchaud

A mom's $97,000 question: How was an air-ambulance ride not medically necessary?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239206451/1241043536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript