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Shots - Health News

Shots

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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If you fear your child may have taken or received too much medicine, call the national poison control hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Giving Medicine To Young Children? Getting The Dose Right Is Tricky

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In Mexican border towns, big discount drugstores, as well as small pharmacies like this one in Tijuana, market their less expensive medicines to American tourists. Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Travelers Seek Cheaper Prescription Drugs In Mexico And Beyond

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Ariel Davis for NPR

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed

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A British study found that people who used e-cigarettes to quit smoking were more successful than those who tried nicotine patches and gum. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Study Found Vaping Beat Traditional Smoking-Cessation Options

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Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

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Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

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Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN
Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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Shots - Health News

Shots

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