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Shots - Health News

Shots

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A new study examines whether or not dogs are able to understand the difference between a human's mistake versus active intent to withhold a treat. Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images hide caption

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Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images

Your Dog May Know If You've Done Something On Purpose, Or Just Screwed Up

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In 'Dopamine Nation,' Overabundance Keeps Us Craving More

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First-graders listen to the interim superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, Megan Reilly, read a book at Normont Elementary School in Harbor City on Aug. 16, the first day of school. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Johnson gives River a bottle in her home in Discovery Bay. Family members spent isolation together there this summer, after getting sick with COVID-19. Everyone has since recovered. Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

Breakthrough COVID Infections Add Even More Chaos To School's Start In 2021

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Don't Focus On Kids' Weight Gain. Focus On Healthy Habits Instead

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Having a compromised immune system puts you at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. Studies show that the initial vaccine doses are less effective for people with weakened immune systems. A third shot can boost protection. Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Kindergartner Allyson Zavala joined with other students and school superintendent Austin Buetner for a class selfie in April inside teacher Alicia Pizzi's classroom at Maurice Sendak Elementary School in North Hollywood, Calif. Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

How To Keep Your Child Safe From The Delta Variant

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Taking photos can sometimes hamper our brain's ability to remember important moments in life. If you're more intentional about the photos you take, they can actually help you capture that moment you're hoping to hold on to. Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR hide caption

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Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR
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Why Sweat Is A Human Superpower

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Medical staff members check on a patient in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston last November. Doctors are now investigating whether people with lingering cognitive symptoms may be at risk for dementia. Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Doctors Worry That Memory Problems After COVID-19 May Set The Stage For Alzheimer's

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Vanderbilt University Medical Center bought the hospital in Lebanon, Tenn., from Community Health Systems in 2019, but the latter is still suing former patients over unpaid medical bills. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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A Health Care Giant Sold Off Dozens Of Hospitals — But Continued Suing Many Patients

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Insurers sometimes don't cover certain contraceptive methods for free, though they are supposed to cover most by law. Even for long-established methods, like IUDs, insurers sometimes make it hard for women to get coverage by requiring preapproval. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

When working out in the summer, watch for the signs of dehydration and heat stroke. Choosing a later evening or early morning time for a run in one smart way to stay safe. RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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Six common types of adult female ticks. Top row, left to right: Lone star, Black-legged, Asian long-horned. Bottom row, left to right: Gulf coast, American dog, Rocky mountain wood (Top row, left to right) Public Health Image Library, Wikimedia Commons, James Gathany/CDC (Bottom row, left to right) Public Health Image Library, Patrick Gorring/iNaturalist, Public Health Image Library hide caption

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(Top row, left to right) Public Health Image Library, Wikimedia Commons, James Gathany/CDC (Bottom row, left to right) Public Health Image Library, Patrick Gorring/iNaturalist, Public Health Image Library

To help keep weak swimmers safe, stay "touch-close" and don't rely on a busy lifeguard to be the only eyes on a crowded pool or beach. It's best, say experts working to prevent drownings, to designate a nondrinking adult to scan the water at any pool party or beach outing, and to rotate that "watching" shift every 30 minutes to keep fresh eyes on the kids. Imgorthand/Getty Images hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Stuck In A Rut? Sometimes Joy Takes A Little Practice

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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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