Your Health : Shots - Health News There's never been more information about how to live a healthy life, yet the goal sometimes seems impossible to reach. We sort through the latest news on how to eat better, live longer and stay well.
Shots - Health News

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Food journalist Barry Estabrook talks with diet gurus and sifts through dieting history and the latest nutrition studies. He discovers that unfortunately, these diets don't really work in the long term for most people because they are too strict or require unnatural patterns of eating. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Nurse Keith Grant got his second dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine on schedule from registered nurse Valerie Massaro in January at the Hartford Convention Center — 21 days after his first immunization. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccine: Don't Miss 2nd Dose Because Of Scheduling Glitches

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Lots of manufacturers offer a rainbow of ink colors. People can even go online and order a bottle. The Food and Drug Administration has not regulated the pigments in tattoo inks so far, but agency officials will investigate and recall tattoo inks if they hear of a specific safety concern, like bacterial contamination that could lead to infections. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

What's In Tattoo Ink? Why Scientists Want To Know

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Tie the ear loops close to the edges of the mask and tuck in the side pleats to minimizes gaps (left). Or use a hair clip to hold the ear loops tightly at the back of the head to achieve a tighter seal. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Naked mole rats are very communicative creatures, they quietly chirp, squeak, twitter or even grunt to one another. The scientists wanted to find out whether these vocalizations have a social function for the animals – and found that each colony has its own dialect that promotes social cohesion. Felix Petermann, MDC hide caption

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Felix Petermann, MDC

Friend Or Foe? Naked Mole Rats Can Tell By A Unique Squeak

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A Writer Lost His Singing Voice, Then Discovered The 'Gymnastics' Of Speech

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With the pandemic, many people are turning to at-home workouts and walks in their neighborhoods. That's good, says Exercised author Daniel Lieberman. "You don't have to do incredible strength training ... to get some benefits of physical activity." Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Grace Cary/Getty Images

Just Move: Scientist Author Debunks Myths About Exercise And Sleep

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Researchers are making progress in understanding the human immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and the vaccine to prevent the disease. Christoph Burgstedt/Science Source hide caption

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Christoph Burgstedt/Science Source

3 Questions And The Emerging Answers About COVID-19 Vaccine Protection

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When it comes to New Year's goal setting, mental health experts say 2021 is the year to try a calmer, gentler approach to health. Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

Staff and residents of the Ararat Nursing Facility in the Mission Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles got COVID-19 shots on Jan. 7. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths have been surging throughout Los Angeles County. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Keep Sharp, by Sanjay Gupta Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

To 'Keep Sharp' This Year, Keep Learning, Advises Neurosurgeon Sanjay Gupta

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Don't Let The Pandemic Winter Get You Down: 9 Creative Ways To Socialize Safely

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The popular Seattle restaurant San Fermo allows only two people inside each of its enclosed dining igloos at a time — to reduce the risk that people from different households will dine together. Will Stone hide caption

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Will Stone

Yurts, Igloos And Pop-Up Domes: How Safe Is 'Outside' Restaurant Dining This Winter?

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Vibe Tribe Adventures is one of many groups nationwide seeking to address barriers that often keep Black women from exploring outdoor activities. Kevin Mohatt for KHN hide caption

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Kevin Mohatt for KHN

Health researchers say wearing masks and washing your hands often is more important than wiping down surfaces when it comes to protecting yourself from the coronavirus. Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It

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Fishermen sell freshly caught seafood at the Saturday Fishermen's Market in Santa Barbara, Calif. When the pandemic began, fishermen watched their markets dry up overnight. Now, as well as public markets like this, some are selling to food assistance programs. April Fulton for NPR hide caption

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April Fulton for NPR

Fishermen Team Up With Food Banks To Help Hungry Families

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Shots - Health News

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