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Radiation was another treatment that researchers were refining at the time. Gordon Isaacs was the first patient treated with the linear accelerator (radiation therapy) for retinoblastoma. Gordon's right eye was removed January 11, 1957 because the cancer had spread. His left eye had only a localized tumor and was treated with the electron beam. Gordon's vision in the left eye returned to normal. NIH/National Cancer Institute hide caption

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NIH/National Cancer Institute

50 years ago, Nixon gave the U.S. a 'Christmas present,' launching the war on cancer

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Planned Parenthood volunteer Sarah Mahoney checks a list of addresses in Windham, Maine to see which door to knock on next. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

A new way to talk about abortion? In Maine, using deep conversation to reach voters

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Demonstrators rally against laws the limit access to abortion at the Texas State Capitol on October 2, 2021 in Austin, Texas. The Women's March and other groups organized marches across the country to protest a new abortion law in Texas. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

Prescribing abortion pills online or mailing them in Texas can now land you in jail

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Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra says doctors who are balking at the rules of the No Surprises Act aren't looking out for patients. "I don't think when someone is overcharging that it's going to hurt the overcharger to now have to [accept] a fair price," Becerra says. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Biden team's rules would push insurance premiums down by 0.5% to 1%. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

When Greta Christina heard that Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians were staging a protest on Oct. 13, 2019, over long wait times for therapy, she made her own sign and showed up to support them. She's had to wait up to six weeks between therapy appointments for her depression. Ingrid Nelson hide caption

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Ingrid Nelson

Americans can wait many weeks to see a therapist. California law aims to fix that

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Protesters take part in the Women's March and Rally for Abortion Justice in Austin, Texas, on Oct. 2. The demonstration targeted Senate Bill 8, a state law that bans nearly all abortions as early as six weeks in a pregnancy, making no exceptions for survivors of rape or incest. SERGIO FLORES/Sergio Flores/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SERGIO FLORES/Sergio Flores/AFP via Getty Images

A box and container of ivermectin arranged in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Americans against taking ivermectin, an anti-parasitic drug, as treatment or prevention against Covid-19. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Like many seniors, William Stork of Cedar Hill, Mo., lacks dental insurance and doesn't want to pay $1,000 for a tooth extraction he needs. Health advocates see President Biden's Build Back Better agenda as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to provide dental coverage to people like Stork who are on Medicare. An unlikely adversary: the American Dental Association. Joe Martinez for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Joe Martinez for Kaiser Health News

Expanded funds for in-home care can help seniors and disabled Americans stay in their homes. Here, Lidia Vilorio, a home health aide, gives her patient Martina Negron her medicine and crackers for her tea in May in Haverstraw, N.Y. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

In between answering 911 calls, Jerrad Dinsmore (left) and Kevin LeCaptain perform a wellness check at the home of a woman in her nineties. The ambulance team in the small town of Waldoboro, Maine was already short-staffed. Then a team member quit recently, after the state mandated all health care workers get the COVID-19 vaccine. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

In Maine, a looming vaccine deadline for EMTs is stressing small-town ambulance crews

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National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins is stepping down by the end of the year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic lawmakers are proposing a way to offer low-income adults Medicaid in states that have so far refused to expand the program. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., spoke about the issue during a press conference with fellow lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol on September 23, 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX) introduced the "Cover Now Act" outside the U.S. Capitol on June 17, 2021. The bill intends to close the health insurance gap in Texas and 11 other states that have not expanded Medicaid to uninsured adults. A similar fix is part of the spending bill being debated in Congress this week, and would provide affordable coverage for more than 2.2 million Americans. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A Death In Dallas: What's At Stake As Congress Weighs A Medicaid Fix For The Uninsured

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Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appears before a Senate committee in July. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP

The FDA Has Been Without A Permanent Leader For 8 Months As COVID Cases Climb

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Macaques check out a camera in Galtaji Temple in Jaipur, India. Monkeys have been known to sneak into swimming pools, courts and even the halls of India's Parliament. One attorney told author Mary Roach about a macaque that infiltrated a medical institute and began pulling out patient IVs. Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Monkey Thieves, Drunk Elephants — Mary Roach Reveals A Weird World Of Animal 'Crime'

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A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City this year. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

The term "fetal heartbeat," as used in the new anti-abortion law in Texas, is misleading and not based on science, say physicians who specialize in reproductive health. What the ultrasound machine detects in an embryo at six weeks of pregnancy is actually just electrical activity from cells that aren't yet a heart. And the sound that you "hear" is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Texas Abortion Ban Hinges On 'Fetal Heartbeat.' Doctors Call That Misleading

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Only kids 12 and older are eligible — so far — to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the U.S. But the shots could be available for younger children as soon as this fall, say researchers studying the vaccine in that age group. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Medicare is funded by a combination of money paid directly to the federal government from paychecks and taxes paid by working Americans. Most dental procedures and tests are not covered under traditional Medicare. Cavan Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images
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