Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.

DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sutter Health Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, in Oakland, Calif. is one of hundreds of hospitals serving poor patients that will get some reprieve from Medicare's readmissions penalties. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images

Health insurers who offer Medicare Advantage plans have permission to soon require patients to try less expensive alternatives to some before receiving pricier drugs. Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images hide caption

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Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

The total bill for Drew Calver's four-day hospital stay at St. David's Medical Center in April 2017 was $164,941. His insurer paid $55,840, leaving Calver responsible for the unpaid balance of $108,951.31. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Demonstrators held signs outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington DC on June 26, 2018 while Democratic leaders called on the Trump administration to uphold the preexisting conditions provision of the Affordable Care Act. Now the issue may be decided in court. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

"We would not be able to foster without Medicaid," says Sherri Croom of Tallahassee, Fla. Croom and her husband, Thomas, have fostered 27 children in the past decade. They're pictured here with four adopted children, two 18-year-old former foster daughters and those daughters' sons. Courtesy of the Croom family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Croom family

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, is eager to preserve an expansion of Medicaid that he pushed through, despite opposition from other members of his party. Ron Schwane/AP hide caption

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Ron Schwane/AP

If you earn too much to get a subsidy to help defray the cost of health insurance, you might find a less expensive policy off an exchange. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Wren Vetens was promised a significant discount on the cost of her gender confirmation surgery if she paid in cash upfront, without using her health insurance. Yet after the surgery, Vetens received an explanation of benefits saying the hospital had billed her insurer nearly $92,000. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Short-term health care plans could be a more affordable option for some consumers, but they're exempt from covering people with pre-existing conditions. Dreet Production/Alloy/Getty Images hide caption

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Dreet Production/Alloy/Getty Images

In the mountain town of Juyaya, Puerto Rico, last October, children watched as U.S. Army helicopters brought a team of physicians to assess the medical needs of the local hospital and residents. Going forward, health economists say, the U.S. territory will need continued federal help to deal with its overwhelming Medicaid expenses. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Republican Gov. Doug Ducey speaks about a variety of issues during an interview in his office at the Arizona Capitol in May 2018, in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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andresr/Getty Images

Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (from left), Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Vice President Pence met on Capitol Hill Tuesday, ahead of meetings with Republican senators. Democrats vow to challenge Kavanaugh's nomination in upcoming hearings. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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