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Screening mammograms, like this one in Chicago in 2012, are among a number of preventive health services the Affordable Care Act has required health plans to cover at no charge to patients. But that could change, if the Sept. 7 ruling by a federal district judge in Texas is upheld on appeal. Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens as then-President Donald Trump answers questions in the press briefing room with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Air Force service members run a timed 1.5 miles during their annual physical fitness test at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois in June. The U.S. Space Force intends to do away with once-a-year assessments in favor of wearable technology. Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio

Tennessee's Medicaid program, TennCare, dropped Katie Lester and her son Mason (right), because of a clerical error in 2019. The Lester family was left uninsured for most of the next three years, including during the birth of youngest child Memphis (left). Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News

Insurers are complying with federal rules aimed at price transparency that took effect July 1, but consumer use of the data may have to wait until private firms synthesize it. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

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DNY59/Getty Images

Dr. Kara Beasley protests the overturning of Roe vs. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 2022. JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images

Doctors weren't considered in Dobbs, but now they're on abortion's legal front lines

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Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, had identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were drastically different — even though the Fresno, California, couple were covered by the same health plan. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

He and his wife both got cataract surgery. His bill was 20 times higher than hers

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Whole Woman's Health of Minnesota, a clinic that opened to patients in February, is one of only eight that provide abortions in the state and is located just a few minutes from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Christina Saint Louis/KHN hide caption

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Christina Saint Louis/KHN

Liz Kirkaldie says her grandson's marijuana use led to his schizophrenia diagnosis. She says she's skeptical the labels will work, "But if it helps even one person? Great." Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

California may require labels on pot products to warn of mental health risks

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Neighbors Richard Small (left), a Republican and longtime NRA member, and Gerardo Marquez, a gun owner and Democrat, both support measures to prevent gun violence. Marina Small for NPR hide caption

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Marina Small for NPR

Many gun owners support gun control. So why don't they speak out?

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Anti-abortion activists protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, May 23. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Retiree Donna Weiner shows some of the daily prescription medications for which she pays more than $6,000 per year through a Medicare prescription drug plan. She supports giving Medicare authority to negotiate drug prices. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Rachel Levine, U.S. assistant secretary for health, says, "The language of medicine and science is being used to drive people to suicide." Political attacks against trans young people are on the rise across the country. Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images

Rachel Levine calls state anti-LGBTQ bills disturbing and dangerous to trans youth

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Moderna says its vaccine appears to be about 51 percent effective for children ages 6 months to less than 2 years, and 37 percent effective for those ages 2 to less than 6 years. Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images

Moderna asks FDA to authorize first COVID-19 vaccine for very young children

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Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy ( left) and Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch teamed up on a series of landmark legislative health care achievements, such as the Ryan White program on AIDS treatment, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the first major federal child care law. John Duricka/AP hide caption

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John Duricka/AP

Medicare's coverage for long-term care is very limited, while Medicaid generally requires people to impoverish themselves before it picks up the tab. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

States must reach out to all Medicaid enrollees to inform them that their eligibility will need to be reevaluated, but many of those states will not be employing one key strategy: texting. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration will meet with outside advisers to talk about the next steps in formulating a COVID-19 vaccination plan. Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Another booster? A vaccine for omicron? Here's what could be next for COVID vaccines

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Mary Daniel took a dishwasher job at her husband's Florida memory care facility to see him during the initial coronavirus lockdown. She has been fighting for visitation rights ever since. Tiffany Manning for NPR hide caption

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Tiffany Manning for NPR

New laws let visitors see loved ones in health care facilities, even in an outbreak

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Through the pandemic, if you needed a coronavirus test, you could get one for free, even without insurance. Now, that is no longer the case in some places, as the federal funding covering the costs has run out. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Free COVID tests and treatments no longer free for uninsured, as funding runs out

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