Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.
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The advice for anyone who got their IRS return rejected because a rogue agent signed them up for ACA health insurance: Ask for an extension and file a complaint. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A record number of Americans are getting health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, and states that use the HealthCare.gov marketplace are vulnerable to a scheme where plans are switched without the consumer's permission. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

California legislators in 2019 passed the law that requires all the state's 33 public university campuses to provide abortion pills. It took effect in January 2023, but LAist found that basic information for students to obtain the medication is often nonexistent. Jackie Fortiér/LAist hide caption

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Jackie Fortiér/LAist
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Mental health care is hard to find, especially for people with Medicare or Medicaid

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Insurance brokers say rogue agents are switching batches of customers to new plans without the customers' knowledge. The agents then collect monthly commissions on the Affordable Care Act plans. Ralf Hahn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralf Hahn/Getty Images

Amid growing concern about children's use of social media, the United Kingdom implemented rules designed to keep kids safer and limit their screen time. The U.S. is weighing similar legislation. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Composting vessels arranged in a honeycomb array at the Recompose human composting facility in Seattle, WA. Recompose hide caption

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Recompose

The ultimate green burial? Human composting lets you replenish the earth after death

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Under Louisiana's abortion ban, doctors face penalties of up to 15 years in prison, $200,000 in fines and loss of their medical license. Dr. Neelima Sukhavasi, a Baton Rouge OB-GYN, says that doctors are scared. Here, Dr. Sukhavasi poses for a portrait in Baton Rouge, La., on Monday, March 18, 2024. Christiana Botic hide caption

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Christiana Botic

Standard pregnancy care is now dangerously disrupted in Louisiana, report reveals

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The share of abortions that are performed with medication alone (a combination of mifepristone and misoprosotol) increased between 2020 and 2023. Rachel Woolf/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Rachel Woolf/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Despite bans in some states, more than a million abortions were provided in 2023

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Sandra Johnson was responding well to an injectable drug to treat her persistent asthma, but then her insurance company stopped allowing her to get it in a process called "prior authorization." Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

People who qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid face maddening challenges accessing health care. The government spends $500 billion on this care, yet patients often can't get what they need. amtitus/Getty Images hide caption

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amtitus/Getty Images

The $81,739.40 bill for her mother's air-ambulance ride arrived less than two weeks after she died, Alicia Wieberg said. Lisa Krantz/KFF Health News hide caption

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Lisa Krantz/KFF Health News

Her air-ambulance ride wasn't covered by Medicare. It will cost her family $81,739

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Tim Lillard at the home he and his late wife, Ann Picha-Lillard, shared in suburban southeast Michigan. Since her death in 2022, Lillard has made it his mission to pass the Safe Patient Care Act, which would create mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios in Michigan hospitals. Beth Weiler/Michigan Public hide caption

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Beth Weiler/Michigan Public

After his wife died, he joined nurses to push for new staffing rules in hospitals

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Prisoner and patient Alton Batiste, 72, in Angola's nursing unit in 2017. The prison had to change some of its rules when it introduced hospice, allowing inmates to touch each other, for instance. Annie Flanagan/Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Annie Flanagan/Washington Post via Getty Images

A House-passed bill would equalize what Medicare pays when certain infusions are given in a hospital with what it pays when they're given in other health care settings. The hospital lobby is fighting it ferociously in the Senate. Eric Harkleroad/KFF Health News hide caption

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Eric Harkleroad/KFF Health News

When can a person be declared dead? The question can be hard to answer. skaman306/Getty Images hide caption

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Debate simmers over when doctors should declare brain death

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Physicians who admit to mental health or addiction issues typically are required to share more details and submit to scrutiny such as monitoring or periodic drug tests. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

Doctors face huge stigma about mental illness. Now there's an effort to change that

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Patients report that ketamine infusions can be lifesaving, with immediate improvement for severe depression. But dosage and safety measures vary widely at the hundreds of clinics that have opened. Yana Iskayeva/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Iskayeva/Getty Images

Former U.S.President Donald Trump speaks during the 2024 Iowa Republican caucuses at Horizon Events Center in West Des Moines, Iowa. Nathan Howard/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Bloomberg via Getty Images