Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.
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First lady Melania Trump with 10-year-old Grace Eline, a guest of President Trump at the State of the Union address Tuesday. Grace was diagnosed with brain cancer last year. Trump cited her experience in calling for more research into childhood cancer treatments. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Austin, Texas, dentist Brad Buckingham received a bill for more than $70,000 after a bike accident landed him in the hospital and he needed emergency hip surgery. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

"There does seem to be across-the-board understanding that what's happening to patients right now isn't right or fair," Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., said about surprise medical bills. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar delivers remarks to reporters while participating in a roundtable about health care prices at the White House on Jan. 23. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., at an Oakland, Calif., campaign rally this week. Harris says she backs a single-payer health system, but she hasn't yet offered details on how she would finance that plan. Mason Trinca/Getty Images hide caption

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Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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Dr. Paul Davis, whose daughter, Elizabeth Moreno, was billed $17,850 for a urine test and featured in KHN-NPR's Bill of the Month series, was among the guests invited to the White House on Wednesday to discuss surprise medical bills with President Trump. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

At an October news conference, the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus called on President Trump to reverse the administration's moves to limit women's access to birth control. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., spoke at the lectern during the event on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Demonstrators affiliated with the National Air Traffic Controllers Association protested the federal shutdown at a Capitol Hill rally earlier this month in Washington, D.C. Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images

A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Furloughed federal workers protest the ongoing, partial shutdown of the federal government during a non-partisan rally Tuesday at Independence Mall, in Philadelphia. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a speech Thursday to the new Congress that Democrats want "to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Democrats' Health Care Ambitions Meet The Reality Of Divided Government

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Demonstrators in favor of and against abortion rights made their beliefs known during a January 2018 protest in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Firefighters are often exposed to carcinogens in the course of their work. Laws in many states say if they get cancer, it should be presumed to be linked to their work. Arisha Singh/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Arisha Singh/EyeEm/Getty Images

Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

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Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

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Charlotte Potts, who has a history of heart problems, lives within sight of Livingston Regional Hospital. After a recent stint there, she was discharged into the care of a home health agency, and now gets treatment in her apartment for some ailments. Shalina Chatlania / WPLN hide caption

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Shalina Chatlania / WPLN

How Helping Patients Get Good Care At Home Helps Rural Hospitals Survive

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Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

In 2015, demonstrators in Washington, D.C., urged Supreme Court justices to save the Affordable Care Act from a legal challenge. The federal health law survived, but last week U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor ruled it invalid. An appeal of his controversial decision is underway. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Judge Who Invalidated Obamacare Has Been A 'Go-To Judge' For Republicans, Critics Say

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