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The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Affordable Care Act navigator Nini Hadwen (right) helped Jorge Hernandez (left) and Marta Aguirre find a plan on the health insurance exchange in Miami in 2013. Today, with fewer navigators, much of that counseling is done by phone instead of in person. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Services like rides to the doctor or wheelchair ramps are among those that some Medicare Advantage plans will begin to offer next year. Razvan Chisu / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Razvan Chisu / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, warned that failure of a Medicaid-funding initiative on the ballot could make for a tough legislative session in 2019. William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

"Most of us are ecstatic" about Medicaid expansion in Utah, said Grant Burningham, of Bountiful. "We were all together and hugging and kissing last night." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

A Winning Idea: Medicaid Expansion Prevails In Idaho, Nebraska And Utah

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, testifying before a House subcommittee in May. There are "very tight restrictions" being placed on the distribution and use of Dsuvia, Gottlieb said Friday in addressing the FDA's approval of the new opioid. But critics of the FDA decision say the drug is unnecessary. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Amanda Cahill, a supporter of Montana's tobacco tax measure, I-185, at a press conference near the state capitol last August. Tobacco firms have spent $17 million in opposition to the initiative, compared to an $8 million campaign by those in favor of it. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Big Tobacco Spends Big To Block A Tax And Medicaid Expansion In Montana

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Open enrollment for 2019 health plans begins Nov. 1 on HealthCare.gov and on most state insurance exchanges. Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR

Looking For ACA Health Insurance For 2019? Here's What To Expect

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Grant Burningham, who lives in Bountiful, Utah, worked to get a referendum on Medicaid expansion on the Utah ballot in November. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

Voters In 4 States Set To Decide On Medicaid Expansion

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"Democrats call it 'Medicare-for-all' because it sounds good, but in reality, it actually ends Medicare in its current form," Speaker of the House Paul Ryan asserted in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Shelton Allwood joined other demonstrators in Miami last year calling for continued protection for people who have pre-existing medical conditions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump announces a plan to overhaul how Medicare pays for certain drugs during a Thursday speech at the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Organizers with Idahoans for Healthcare have been driving this green vehicle around the state to campaign for Medicaid expansion. Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in July concerning Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation. It is thought that a challenge to Roe v. Wade could have a chance of passing now that he is confirmed. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sutter Health Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, in Oakland, Calif. is one of hundreds of hospitals serving poor patients that will get some reprieve from Medicare's readmissions penalties. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Skull fractures, concussions and broken bones are common injuries when children not yet able to walk use infant walkers and fall down stairs. Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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