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Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds

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A Guatemalan teen asylum-seeker (left), who isn't able to hear or speak, signs with his mom in Florida. He was brusquely separated from her and held in a shelter for nearly three months, unable to readily communicate, according to a civil rights complaint filed with the Department of Homeland Security. Susan Ferriss/Center for Public Integrity hide caption

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Susan Ferriss/Center for Public Integrity

Homeland Security's Civil Rights Unit Lacks Power To Protect Migrant Kids

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"As deductibles rise, patients have the right to know the price of health care services so they can shop around for the best deal," says Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and announced the Trump administration's plan this week. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Opponents running to Joe Biden's left say his health plan for America merely "tinkers around the edges" of the Affordable Care Act. But a close read reveals some initiatives in Biden's plan that are so expansive they might have trouble passing even a Congress held by Democrats. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Alexis Conell battled end-stage renal disease for years before receiving her kidney transplant in 2012. Paying for the drugs needed to keep her kidneys healthy is a struggle. Taylor Glascock for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for Kaiser Health News

Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar announced his agency is dropping a proposal intended to lower drug prices. Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Demonstrators rallied in Sacramento in May for Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented Californians. When the state's budget was finalized, only young adults up to age 26 were authorized to be included in the expansion. Gov. Gavin Newsom says that's an important first step. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Young Undocumented Californians Cheer Promise Of Health Benefits

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President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday proposing to change how kidney disease is treated in the United States. It encourages in-home dialysis and more kidney donations. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Announces Plans To Shake Up The Kidney Care Industry

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For 25 years, the federal Violence Against Women Act has required any state that wants to be eligible for certain federal grants to certify that the state covers the cost of medical forensic exams for people who have been sexually assaulted. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Demonstrators from Doctors for America marched in support of the Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court in March 2015. Now, another case aims to undo the federal health law: Texas v. United States could land in front of the Supreme Court ahead of the 2020 election. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From 2012 through 2016, federal health inspectors cited 87% of U.S. hospices for deficiencies. And 20% had lapses serious enough to endanger patients, according to two new reports from the HHS Inspector General's Office. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General Finds Serious Flaws In 20% Of U.S. Hospice Programs

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The American Medical Association is suing North Dakota over two laws relating to abortion. Cultura RM Exclusive/Sigrid Gomb/Getty Images hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/Sigrid Gomb/Getty Images

American Medical Association Wades Into Abortion Debate With Lawsuit

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Alison Beyea of ACLU of Maine speaks during an abortion-rights rally at Congress Square Park in Portland, Maine, in May. Democrats elected last November have pushed through two laws that expand access to abortion in the state. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Newly Blue, Maine Expands Access To Abortion

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A Trump administration rule has been delayed by courts. It was intended to protect health care workers who refuse to be involved in procedures they object to for moral or religious reasons. thelinke/Getty Images hide caption

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thelinke/Getty Images

Using embryonic stem cells, researchers created a structure that mimics the earliest stages of human development in the womb. This image shows the structure breaking the symmetry of the sphere, which starts the development of more complex structures that eventually develop into a fetus. Mijo Simunovic, Ph.D., Simons Junior Fellow, The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Mijo Simunovic, Ph.D., Simons Junior Fellow, The Rockefeller University

Scientists Make Model Embryos From Stem Cells To Study Key Steps In Human Development

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Dr. Rebekah Gee, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health, negotiated a deal with a drugmaker to get the state a better price for expensive hepatitis C medications for its Medicaid and prison populations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

An executive order President Trump signed Monday aims to make most hospital pricing more transparent to patients, long before they get the bill. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

The executive order on drug price transparency that President Trump signed Monday doesn't spell out specific actions; rather, it directs the department of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-making process. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Pushes To Make Health Care Pricing More Transparent

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CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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