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Joe Biden rallied supporters Wednesday, Nov. 4, in Wilmington, Del. Though he is now U.S. president-elect, Biden will have to await outcomes of January run-off races in the Senate to know much support he's likely to get there for his health care agenda. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett's first opportunity to weigh in on abortion and contraception could come as early as this week, as the high court decides whether to take up a Mississippi case. Demetrius Freeman/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

People stand in line for early voting at the John F. Kennedy Library on Oct. 27 in Hialeah, Fla. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

More Than Politics On The Line For Voters With Preexisting Conditions

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Health care activists rallied in front of the U.S. Capitol on March 22, 2017, to protest Republican efforts that would have dismantled the Affordable Care Act and capped federal payments for Medicaid patients. The Republican congressional bills, part of the party's "repeal and replace" push in 2017, were eventually defeated. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump has promised at campaign rallies to protect patients with preexisting conditions, but he has not explained how he plans to do that. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

When Angela Settles' husband, Darius, got sick with COVID-19, he was worried about medical bills. He worked two jobs but had no health insurance. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN News

Hospital Bills For Uninsured COVID-19 Patients Are Covered, But No One Tells Them

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Open enrollment is about to start for those buying private insurance off state or federal exchanges. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

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Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

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Demonstrators pray in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on July 8, a day the court ruled that employers with religious objections can decline to provide contraception coverage under the Affordable Care Act. With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the ACA's future is in doubt. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

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Dr. Scott Atlas is President Trump's new coronavirus adviser. His ideas are sometimes at odds with those of public health professionals. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

President Trump's New COVID-19 Adviser Is Making Public Health Experts Nervous

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President Trump delivers remarks last week on the Farmers to Families Food Box program at Flavor 1st Growers and Packers in Mills River, N.C. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

How Trump's Food Box Initiative Overpaid And Underdelivered

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn drew a hailstorm of criticism from scientists this week for mischaracterizing a study's findings in a way that hyped the benefits of convalescent plasma. He later apologized, but critics say the damage was done. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AP

Dr. Deborah Birx speaks to reporters this week outside the Arkansas Governor's Mansion in Little Rock. Birx indicated that data on U.S. COVID-19 hospitalizations will move back to the CDC under a "revolutionary new data system" the agency is developing. Andrew DeMillo/AP hide caption

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Andrew DeMillo/AP

Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

The Trump administration abruptly required hospitals to stop reporting COVID-19 data to the CDC and to use a new reporting system set up by a contractor. Two weeks in, the promised improvements in the data have yet to materialize. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

COVID-19 Hospital Data System That Bypasses CDC Plagued By Delays, Inaccuracies

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