Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569953391/570093156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine, walks through the Capitol with colleagues in early December. Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Proposed changes to the tax law could eliminate the deduction for medical expenses. Those who use it generally have very high medical expenses, often for a disabled child, a serious chronic illness or expensive long-term care not covered by health insurance. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PeopleImages/Getty Images

Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567267266/567573028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When young people turn 18, they typically sign their own paperwork before receiving medical care that says they will pay what the insurer doesn't cover. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maskot/Getty Images

Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery, for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563815531/565881252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565357546/565506575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services — and its controversial center for innovation — is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and has its headquarters outside D.C., in Woodlawn, Md. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Alex Azar, who was deputy secretary for Health and Human Services in the George W. Bush administration, is President Trump's pick to replace Dr. Tom Price as head of the department. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Picks Alex Azar To Lead Health And Human Services

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563735136/563894879" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., listen to debate on tax reform on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rosemary Warnock, a registered nurse at Maine Health, exits the Merrill Auditorium voting station in Portland, Maine, early Tuesday. She said she was motivated to vote for Medicaid expansion. Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images

After Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Governor Raises Objections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562758848/562903286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kathleen Phelps, who lacks health insurance, speaks in favor of expanding Medicaid at a news conference in Portland, Maine on Oct. 13, 2016. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

When Ohio voters head to the polls Tuesday, they'll be able to weigh in on a ballot measure that aims to get better drug prices for state programs. Jay LaPrete/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jay LaPrete/Getty Images

Minnesota's ACA insurance exchange, MNsure, is spending state money this year to hire health care navigators who reach out to consumers to answer questions and help them find the right health plan. Mark Zdechlik/MPR News hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Zdechlik/MPR News

Need Help Picking An ACA Health Plan? Some States Are Reaching Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560195060/561298500" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Diane Brown, executive director of the Arizona Public Interest Research Group, talks to college students about the benefits of buying health coverage on the exchanges. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Will Stone/KJZZ

With ACA Plans A Tougher Sell, Insurers Bring On The Puppies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561124167/561246262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript