Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.

When young people turn 18, they typically sign their own paperwork before receiving medical care that says they will pay what the insurer doesn't cover. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery, for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services — and its controversial center for innovation — is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and has its headquarters outside D.C., in Woodlawn, Md. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Alex Azar, who was deputy secretary for Health and Human Services in the George W. Bush administration, is President Trump's pick to replace Dr. Tom Price as head of the department. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Picks Alex Azar To Lead Health And Human Services

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House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., listen to debate on tax reform on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rosemary Warnock, a registered nurse at Maine Health, exits the Merrill Auditorium voting station in Portland, Maine, early Tuesday. She said she was motivated to vote for Medicaid expansion. Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images

After Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Governor Raises Objections

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Kathleen Phelps, who lacks health insurance, speaks in favor of expanding Medicaid at a news conference in Portland, Maine on Oct. 13, 2016. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

When Ohio voters head to the polls Tuesday, they'll be able to weigh in on a ballot measure that aims to get better drug prices for state programs. Jay LaPrete/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay LaPrete/Getty Images

Minnesota's ACA insurance exchange, MNsure, is spending state money this year to hire health care navigators who reach out to consumers to answer questions and help them find the right health plan. Mark Zdechlik/MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR News

Need Help Picking An ACA Health Plan? Some States Are Reaching Out

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Diane Brown, executive director of the Arizona Public Interest Research Group, talks to college students about the benefits of buying health coverage on the exchanges. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

With ACA Plans A Tougher Sell, Insurers Bring On The Puppies

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Christy Torres of Foundations Communities in Austin contacts people who bought insurance on Healthcare.Gov. to tell them it's almost time to renew. Martin Do Nascimento/KUT hide caption

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Martin Do Nascimento/KUT

With Federal Funds Cut, Others Must Lead Health Insurance Sign-Up Efforts

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Ilia Henderson (left) is planning to sign up for a health insurance plan on the federal marketplace with help from Charlotte, N.C.-based navigator Julieanne Taylor (right) again this year. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

Reductions In Federal Funding For Health Law Navigators Cut Unevenly

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Julie Eldred is back at home in Massachusetts now. But she was sentenced to a treatment program for opioid addiction as part of a probation agreement, then sent to jail when she relapsed. Some addiction specialists say that's unjust. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Court To Rule On Whether Relapse By An Addicted Opioid User Should Be A Crime

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The Washington Post reports that President Trump, shown here with former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, personally intervened to delay approval of Iowa's waiver application. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images