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National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins is stepping down by the end of the year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic lawmakers are proposing a way to offer low-income adults Medicaid in states that have so far refused to expand the program. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., spoke about the issue during a press conference with fellow lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol on September 23, 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX) introduced the "Cover Now Act" outside the U.S. Capitol on June 17, 2021. The bill intends to close the health insurance gap in Texas and 11 other states that have not expanded Medicaid to uninsured adults. A similar fix is part of the spending bill being debated in Congress this week, and would provide affordable coverage for more than 2.2 million Americans. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appears before a Senate committee in July. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP

The FDA Has Been Without A Permanent Leader For 8 Months As COVID Cases Climb

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Macaques check out a camera in Galtaji Temple in Jaipur, India. Monkeys have been known to sneak into swimming pools, courts and even the halls of India's Parliament. One attorney told author Mary Roach about a macaque that infiltrated a medical institute and began pulling out patient IVs. Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Monkey Thieves, Drunk Elephants — Mary Roach Reveals A Weird World Of Animal 'Crime'

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A health care worker fills a syringe with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City this year. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

The term "fetal heartbeat," as used in the new anti-abortion law in Texas, is misleading and not based on science, say physicians who specialize in reproductive health. What the ultrasound machine detects in an embryo at six weeks of pregnancy is actually just electrical activity from cells that aren't yet a heart. And the sound that you "hear" is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Texas Abortion Ban Hinges On 'Fetal Heartbeat.' Doctors Call That Misleading

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Only kids 12 and older are eligible — so far — to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the U.S. But the shots could be available for younger children as soon as this fall, say researchers studying the vaccine in that age group. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Medicare is funded by a combination of money paid directly to the federal government from paychecks and taxes paid by working Americans. Most dental procedures and tests are not covered under traditional Medicare. Cavan Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images

A special open enrollment period on all Affordable Care Act marketplaces, including on the federal insurance exchange, HealthCare.gov, runs until Aug. 15. Many people qualify for free or low-cost plans. HealthCare.gov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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HealthCare.gov/Screenshot by NPR

Uninsured Or Unemployed? You Might Be Missing Out On Free Health Insurance

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Mikkel and Kayla Kjelshus' daughter, Charlie, had a complication during delivery that caused her oxygen levels to drop and put her at risk for brain damage. Charlie needed seven days of neonatal intensive care, which resulted in a huge bill — $207,455 for the NICU alone — and confusion over which parent's insurer would cover the little girl's health costs. Christopher Smith for KHN hide caption

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Christopher Smith for KHN

Insurers sometimes don't cover certain contraceptive methods for free, though they are supposed to cover most by law. Even for long-established methods, like IUDs, insurers sometimes make it hard for women to get coverage by requiring preapproval. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

President Biden has stepped lightly into the abortion politics fray, taking few actions to reverse the previous administration's anti-abortion-rights policies. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A Teton County emergency medical services volunteer outside the Benefis Teton Medical Center in Choteau, Mont. Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio

Rural Ambulance Services At Risk As Volunteers Age And Expenses Mount

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Advocates for expanding Medicaid in Kansas staged a protest outside the entrance to the statehouse parking garage in Topeka in May 2019. Today, twelve states have still not expanded Medicaid. The biggest are Texas, Florida, and Georgia, but there are a few outside the South, including Wyoming and Kansas. John Hanna/AP hide caption

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John Hanna/AP

12 Holdout States Haven't Expanded Medicaid, Leaving 2 Million People In Limbo

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Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, leads some of the Biden administration's efforts to expand Medicaid access. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Since moving into her own place, Rita Stewart says, she feels healthier, supported and hasn't returned to the emergency room. "This is a chance for me to take care of myself better." Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

In Health Care, More Money Is Being Spent On Patients' Social Needs. Is It Working?

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, sworn in last week as the administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, says she will focus on improving Americans' access to health care. Any discussions of shoring up Medicare funding, she says, should also entail strengthening the program's benefits. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

Kelly Hans holds a box of Narcan nasal spray at the county's One-Stop Shop in Austin. Mitch Legan/WTIU/WFIU News hide caption

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Mitch Legan/WTIU/WFIU News

Indiana Needle Exchange That Helped Contain A Historic HIV Outbreak To Be Shut Down

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