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Shots - Health News

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States Sue Drugmakers Over Alleged Generic-Price-Fixing Scheme

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Clarisa Corber at work at a Topeka, Kan., insurance agency. Corber and her husband — who have three kids, a health plan and $15,000 in medical debt — were profiled in a recent Los Angeles Times investigation into the effects of high-deductible health plans. Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times hide caption

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Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times

Employees Start To Feel The Squeeze Of High-Deductible Health Plans

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Studies show that when doctors practice compassion, patients fare better, and doctors experience less burnout. Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Google is looking to artificial intelligence as a way to make a mark in health care. Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google Searches For Ways To Put Artificial Intelligence To Use In Health Care

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The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

RaDonda Vaught appears at a court hearing with her attorney, Peter Strianse, in February. Vaught, a former nurse at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, was charged with reckless homicide after a medication error killed a patient. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, will lead the Senate Finance Committee's questioning Tuesday of executives from pharmacy benefit managers about drug costs. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Drug Industry Middlemen To Be Questioned By Senate Committee

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Before it closed March 1, the 25-bed Columbia River Hospital, in Celina, Tenn., served the town of 1,500 residents. The closest hospital now is 18 miles from Celina — a 30-minute or more drive on mountain roads. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees

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If a doctor's office is like Blockbuster, Hims feels more like Netflix. It's a way to skip the long waits and crowds and get generic Viagra, hair growth treatment and other medicine and vitamins with minimal interaction with a health care provider — for better and worse. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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A medical assistant administers insulin to an adolescent patient who has Type 1 diabetes. Cigna's pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts, says it covers 1.4 million people who take insulin. Picture Alliance/Getty Images hide caption

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Both Democrats and Republicans have introduced proposals that would impose a cap on out-of-pocket costs of prescription drugs for Medicare patients. But it's still unclear whether those moves will gain a foothold. Jeffrey Hamilton/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Hamilton/Getty Images

The uncompensated care costs among Colorado hospitals dropped by more than 60 percent after the state expanded Medicaid coverage — a savings of more than $400 million statewide. But a new report asks why the hospitals didn't pass some of those savings on to patients. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

The new strategy of some health plans for state employees is to pay hospitals a certain percentage above the basic Medicare reimbursement rate. It allows hospitals a small profit, the states say, while reducing costs to states and patients. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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The reality of electronic medical records has yet to live up to the promise. suedhang/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Why The Promise Of Electronic Health Records Has Gone Unfulfilled

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"What's important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability," Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Opioid Litigation Brings Company Secrets Into The Public Eye

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Eli Lilly and Company, based in Indianapolis, is rolling out a half-price version of its insulin Humalog that will be sold as a generic. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

How Much Difference Will Eli Lilly's Half-Price Insulin Make?

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One health insurance startup charges patients extra for procedures not covered by their basic health plan. The out-of-pocket cost for a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy might range from $900 to $3,000 extra, while a lumbar spine fusion could range from $5,000 to $10,000. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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The proposed legislation aims to reduce patients' costs by beefing up a Texas Department of Insurance program that scrutinizes surprise balance bills greater than $500 from any emergency health care provider. Kameleon007/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., (left) and Sen. Everett Dirksen, R-Ill., (second from left) clashed at the reopening of a Senate drug investigation in 1960 over whether witnesses could be forced to reveal business secrets while testifying. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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