Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Health Inc.

After a hospital stay, many patients are surveyed to weigh in on how good their experience was. Survey results can affect how much hospitals get paid. But instances of racial or other discrimination are not covered in the surveys. David Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Sacks/Getty Images

Surgical instruments used in a kidney transplant in 2016. The agency that oversees organ allocation, the United Network for Organ Sharing, is under scrutiny after a report documented loss and waste of donated organs, often because of problems transporting the organs. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Riley/AP

Transplant agency is criticized for donor organs arriving late, damaged or diseased

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118009567/1118009568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rural communities with struggling hospitals often turn to outside investors willing to take over their health care centers. Some are willing to sell the hospitals for next to nothing to companies that promise to keep them running. MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Delta-8 products are set for testing at Virginia Commonwealth University's forensic science lab. These products come in different forms and packaging, many of which are designed to look like candies or cereal. Crixell Matthews/VPM News hide caption

toggle caption
Crixell Matthews/VPM News

States look to regulate weed alternatives like delta-8 as sales explode

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114246987/1114759063" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lucille Brooks, a retiree who lives in Pittsford, New York, was sued in 2020 for nearly $8,000 by a nursing home that had taken care of her brother. The nursing home dropped the case after she showed she had no control over his money or authority to make decisions for him. Heather Ainsworth for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Heather Ainsworth for KHN

Nursing homes are suing friends and family to collect on patients' bills

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113134049/1114335494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The FDA is trying to make "bivalent" COVID vaccines, which target two different antigens, available as soon as September. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Reformulated COVID vaccine boosters may be available earlier than expected

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113615330/1113615331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kristi Alcayaga's teenage son, Michael, was able to try a cancer drug called clofarabine that got an accelerated approval from the Food and Drug Administration. But the medicine didn't help him. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Kristi Alcayaga's teenage son, Michael, was able to try a cancer drug called clofarabine that got an accelerated approval from the Food and Drug Administration. But the medicine didn't help him. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Drugmakers are slow to prove medicines that got a fast track to market really work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110830985/1112970297" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mifepristone (Mifeprex) and Misoprostol, the two drugs used in a medication abortion, can also be prescribed for other medical uses. However some pharmacists have refused to fill prescriptions for them. ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

Supporters of abortion rights rally at the Minnesota State Capitol Building in downtown St. Paul following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade. Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Jeni Rae Peters and daughter embrace at their home in Rapid City, S.D. In 2020, Peters was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. After treatment, Peters estimates that her medical bills exceeded $30,000. Dawnee LeBeau for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dawnee LeBeau for NPR

She was already battling cancer. Then she had to fight the bill collectors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110370391/1110667163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new rules will help people get upfront cost estimates for about 500 so-called "shoppable" services, meaning medical care they can schedule ahead of time. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DNY59/Getty Images

Jon Miller sits in his bedroom with his dog, Carlos, whom he received as a present for successfully completing cancer treatment a decade ago. Miller sustained severe brain damage, and requires the help of home health aides to continue living in his home. Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media

Claudia and Jesús Fierro of Yuma, Ariz., review their medical bills. They pay $1,000 a month for health insurance yet still owed more than $7,000 after two episodes of care at the local hospital. Lisa Hornak for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Lisa Hornak for Kaiser Health News

Hit with $7,146 for two hospital bills, a family sought health care in Mexico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1094636821/1094970710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Virginia Mayo/AP

'Pandemic, Inc.' author says financial predators made more than $1 billion off COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091678178/1092347613" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Suzanne and Jim Rybak, inside the craft room where their son, Jameson, would encourage Suzanne to make colorful beach bags, received a $4,928 medical bill months after it was supposedly resolved. By Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
By Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News

Mary Daniel took a dishwasher job at her husband's Florida memory care facility to see him during the initial coronavirus lockdown. She has been fighting for visitation rights ever since. Tiffany Manning for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tiffany Manning for NPR

New laws let visitors see loved ones in health care facilities, even in an outbreak

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1086216581/1089671066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Close friends Joshua Paredes, Michael Walujo and John LeBlanc are working together to set up a crisis help line for nurses following the suicide of their friend Michael Odell in January. Rachel Bujalski for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Bujalski for NPR

RaDonda Vaught and her attorney, Peter Strianse, listen as verdicts are read at her trial in Nashville, Tenn., on Friday, March 25. The jury found Vaught, a former nurse, guilty of criminally negligent homicide and gross neglect of an impaired adult in the death of a patient to whom she accidentally gave the wrong medication. Nicole Hester/The Tennessean/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Hester/The Tennessean/AP
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About