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Regeneron has developed a drug called REGN-COV2 that is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that block the virus that causes COVID-19. The company has a contract to supply up to 300 million doses to the U.S. government. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Moncef Slaoui, a former GlaxoSmithKline executive, speaks during the kickoff announcement for Operation Warp Speed in the White House Rose Garden on May 15. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

After Months Of Questions, A Key Operation Warp Speed Adviser's Contract Emerges

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When Tiffany Qiu found herself on the hook for her usual 30% Blue Shield of California coinsurance after the hospital quoted 20%, she pushed back. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Hit With An Unexpectedly High Medical Bill, Here's How A Savvy Patient Fought Back

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On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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A volunteer received an injection as part of a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Studies of vaccines backed by Operation Warp Speed have enrolled tens of thousands of people in a matter of months. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A volunteer in a clinical trial for an experimental COVID-19 vaccine receives an injection last month at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump announced the creation of Operation Warp Speed in May to fast-track a coronavirus vaccine. He called it "a massive scientific and industrial, logistic endeavor unlike anything our country has seen since the Manhattan Project." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Operation Warp Speed's Big Vaccine Contracts Could Stay Secret

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More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Mercy Hospital & Medical Center survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 ― but it lost the battle of modern health care economics. In July, Chicago's first hospital told regulators that it will end inpatient services as soon as February. Taylor Glascock for KHN hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for KHN

Worried registered nurses held a vigil in July at Sutter Health's Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, Calif., to remember their colleague Janine Paiste-Ponder, who caught the coronavirus, likely from a patient, and died from complications. National Nurses United hide caption

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National Nurses United

When the pandemic hit this spring, U.S. rural hospitals lost an estimated 70% of their income as patients avoided the emergency room, doctor's appointments and elective surgeries. "It was devastating," says Maggie Elehwany of the National Rural Health Association. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Siblings Jasmine and Josh Obra both tested positive for the coronavirus on the same day. Only one of them survived. The Obra family hide caption

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The Obra family

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, new suppliers have jumped into the market for surgical masks. Some have touted FDA certificates that don't have any regulatory meaning. Aleksandr Zubkov/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandr Zubkov/Getty Images

'Meaningless' FDA Certificates Are Used To Tout Dubious Face Masks

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It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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Some cities, such as Washington, D.C. are offering free coronavirus testing for people who've attended protests. Where free tests aren't available, some people may find insurance refuses to cover precautionary testing. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Insurers May Only Pay For Coronavirus Tests When They're 'Medically Necessary'

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Costs have gone up for addiction treatment centers in recent months, as they have had to invest in teletherapy and personal protective gear. "We are at risk for not having the funding that we need to keep our doors open," says one medical director. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

A New Addiction Crisis: Treatment Centers Face Financial Collapse

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The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection in May. Pfizer's candidate for a coronavirus vaccine is one of number that are in various stages of development around the world. University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End

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Dr. Ming Lin was fired from his position as an emergency room physician at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington after publicly complaining about the hospital's infection control procedures during the pandmic. Yoshimi Lin hide caption

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Yoshimi Lin
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