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Dr. Lee Merritt is a orthopedic and spinal surgeon who spreads misinformation about COVID-19. She is affiliated with a prominent right-wing group known as America's Frontline Doctors. R. Kellman/Screenshot from Rumble hide caption

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R. Kellman/Screenshot from Rumble

A doctor spread COVID misinformation and renewed her license with a mouse click

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Subin Yang for NPR

6 tips to help you pick the right health insurance plan

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When Caitlin Wells Salerno and Jon Salerno's first son, Hank, was born, his delivery cost the family only $30. Gus' bill came in at more than $16,000, all told — including the $2,755 ER charge. The family was responsible for about $3,600 of the total. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

A hospital hiked the price of a routine childbirth by calling it an 'emergency'

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Nurses check on a patient in a Jonesboro, Ark., ICU in August when the delta variant sparked yet another surge of serious COVID-19 cases in the region. The pandemic has only added to a longstanding nursing shortage in the U.S., statistics show. Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

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Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University's in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Worn-out nurses hit the road for better pay, stressing hospital budgets — and morale

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Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

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Registered nurse Christie Lindog works at the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, Calif., on Sept. 2. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals brace for an onslaught this winter, from flu as well as COVID

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Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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According to the State Department, 14 au pair agencies operate in the U.S. These private companies are required to offer the child care workers who contract with them basic health coverage. But the plans often amount to emergency or travel insurance — not the kind of full coverage ACA health plans offer. Petri Oeschger/Getty Images hide caption

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Petri Oeschger/Getty Images

A civil suit filed by the Justice Department this week links exaggerated patient bills to tens of millions of dollars in overcharges by Medicare Advantage plans. A data analytics team facilitated the fraud, the lawsuit alleges. John Lund/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lund/Getty Images

Ely Bair had two medically necessary jaw surgeries. For the first, in 2018, his share of the bill was $3,000. For the second, in 2019 after a job change, he was billed $27,000, even though he had the same insurance carrier. Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News

Same Hospital And Insurer, But The Bill For His 2nd Jaw Procedure Was $24,000 More

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Then-Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar (left) and President Donald Trump listen as Moncef Slaoui of Operation Warp Speed speaks about the crash program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine in the White House Rose Garden in May 2020. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The U.S. Paid Billions To Get Enough COVID Vaccines Last Fall. What Went Wrong?

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Jameson Rybak, son of Jim and Suzanne Rybak of Florence, S.C., struggled with opioid addiction and died of an overdose on June 9, 2020 — three months after he left a hospital ER because he feared he couldn't afford treatment. Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News

Many hospitals around the country, including Medstar Washington Hospital in Washington, D.C., have started sharing their prices online in compliance with a recent federal rule. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals Have Started Posting Their Prices Online. Here's What They Reveal

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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News
Rose Wong for NPR/KHN

A Hospital Charged More Than $700 For Each Push Of Medicine Through Her IV

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In this 2009 photo, Stephen Cox (left), Mike Forte (center), and Maria Gallo (right), all medical students then, were busy studying a cadaver in the lab at Rocky Vista University's Parker, Colo., campus. Rocky Vista, a for-profit institution, last month received the green light for an accredited satellite campus in Billings, Mont. Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken Lyons/Denver Post via Getty Images

Truck driver José Mendoza has a Humana HMO plan through his employer. It has a $5,000 deductible and 50% coinsurance, leaving him financially vulnerable. Bryan Cereijo for KHN hide caption

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Bryan Cereijo for KHN

A $10,322 Tab For A Sleep Apnea Study Is Enough To Wreck One Patient's Rest

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In December 2019, Cynthia Carrillo placed her older brother David at Villa Mesa Care Center, a nursing home in Upland, Calif. After the shutdown in March of 2020, Cynthia Carrillo couldn't visit David inside Villa Mesa. One month later, David, 65, who had Down syndrome, died from COVID-19. Chava Sanchez/LAist hide caption

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Chava Sanchez/LAist

In California, Nursing Home Owners Can Operate After They're Denied A License

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Dr. Michael Maniaci and Dr. Margaret Paulson confer at the Mayo Clinic's hospital-at-home command center in Jacksonville, Florida. Mayo Clinic hide caption

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Mayo Clinic

The Pandemic Proved Hospitals Can Deliver Care To Seriously Ill Patients At Home

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Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, listens as Robert Kramer, president and chief executive officer of Emergent BioSolutions, testifies during a Wednesday hearing of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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