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Unlike Planned Parenthood which pulled out of Title X family planning funding, many clinics still take the funding and must comply with new rules on discussing abortion. Doctors worry it will affect their relationships with patients. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

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Groupon and other deal sites are the latest marketing tactic in medicine, offering bargain prices for services such as CT scans. Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Bags of heroin, some laced with fentanyl, picked up in a 2016 New York City drug bust. "Basically, [fentanyl] is so cheap to produce and it's so powerful, that drug dealers began realizing it was a way to increase their profits," Fentanyl, Inc. author Ben Westhoff says. But miscalculations of the amount used can be deadly. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Fentanyl As A Dark Web Profit Center, From Chinese Labs To U.S. Streets

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UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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State's attorney Brad Beckworth lays out one of his closing arguments in Oklahoma's case against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla. in July. The judge in the case ruled Monday that J&J must pay $572 million to the state. Chris Landsberger/AP hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/AP

Oklahoma Wanted $17 Billion To Fight Its Opioid Crisis: What's The Real Cost?

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In rugged, rural areas, patients often have little choice about how they'll get to the hospital in an emergency. "The presence of private equity in the air ambulance industry indicates that investors see profit opportunities," a 2017 report from the federal Government Accountability Office notes. pidjoe/Getty Images hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

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The wide-open spaces of Arco, Idaho, appeal to some doctors with a love of the outdoors. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

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Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Creative Recruiting Helps Rural Hospitals Overcome Doctor Shortages

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A large new "sensory space" at Pittsburgh International Airport is divided into separate rooms; families can tailor sound and light levels to each traveler, whatever their age. Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport hide caption

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Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport

Kids And Adults With Autism Flying Easier In Pittsburgh, With Airport's Help

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Plump red blood cells — tumbling amid infection-fighting white blood cells and purple platelets in this colorized, microscopic view — need adequate levels of iron to be able to carry and deliver oxygen around the body. Iron-deficiency anemia is sometimes remedied with IV iron infusions — and the bill can vary by thousands of dollars. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Sovereign Valentine, a personal trainer in Plains, Mont., needs dialysis for his end-stage renal disease. When he first started dialysis treatments, Fresenius Kidney Care clinic in Missoula charged $13,867.74 per session, or about 59 times the $235 Medicare pays for a dialysis session. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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The same steep growth and use of big data that attracted venture capital cash to companies that administer Medicare Advantage plans have led to scrutiny of the companies by government officials. Federal audits estimate such plans nationwide have overcharged taxpayers nearly $10 billion annually. 123light/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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How Does Drug Pricing Work? Hint: It's More Like Designer Handbags Than Cars

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Federal Judge Orders Release Of Dataset Showing Drug Industry's Role In Opioid Crisis

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Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter begins closing statements during the opioid trial at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla., on Monday, July 15. It's the first public trial to emerge from roughly 2,000 U.S. lawsuits aimed at holding drugmakers accountable for the nation's opioid epidemic. Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman

Pain Meds As Public Nuisance? Oklahoma Tests A Legal Strategy For Opioid Addiction

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Medicare Advantage plans, administered by private insurance companies under contract with Medicare, treat more than 22 million seniors — more than 1 in 3 people on Medicare. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Physicians complain that there's not yet a standard drug-pricing tool available to them that includes the range of medicine prices each of their patients might face — one that takes into account their particular pharmacy choice and health insurance plan. Exdez/Getty Images hide caption

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R. Alan Pritchard, one of two attorneys for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, heads into Shelby County General Sessions Court Wednesday in Memphis. He asked the court to drop more than two dozen cases as the hospital reviews its collection policies. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50
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