Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.

CVS Health has struck a deal to buy Aetna, the insurance giant. The combined companies would have more clout with drugmakers and would aim to bring more health care to consumers in retail clinics. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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MedStar Health clinic in Washington, D.C. An affiliated MedStar hospital is just one of many facilities throughout the U.S. that have been hit with shortages of certain medications because of recent hurricane damage to manufacturers in Puerto Rico. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Hurricane Damage To Manufacturers In Puerto Rico Affects Mainland Hospitals, Too

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Gloria Single and her husband Bill Single in the dining hall of the skilled nursing floor at Pioneer House nursing home in Sacramento. AARP Foundation attorneys say California needs to more tightly enforce laws that prohibit evictions of the sort that separated the Singles, and sped up her physical decline. Aubrey Jones hide caption

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Aubrey Jones

AARP Foundation Sues Nursing Home To Stop Illegal Evictions

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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, center, and other lawmakers have a plan to overhaul the tax code that includes a provision that would repeal a tax credit for makers of drugs for rare diseases. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa and Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota want drugmakers to stop wasting money by making eyedrops that are too big. Douglas Graham/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Graham/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

People hoping to get health insurance coverage in 2018 may need to make sure their 2017 premiums are paid. Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images hide caption

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Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images

Lines like this one at a health insurance enrollment fair at the Ambrose Community Center in Bay Point, Calif., in 2014 may be longer this winter. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

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Matt Roth for ProPublica

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

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Tape worm pills were once advertised as a way to stay thin. Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

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Lori Wallace says it's frustrating to constantly hear messages in ads for hospitals that imply her cancer would go away if she were just more positive and tried harder. Sam Harnett/KQED hide caption

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Sam Harnett/KQED

The Painful Side Of Positive Health Care Marketing

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Drug lobbyists and consumer health advocates fill the halls of the state Capitol in September to see how Assembly members vote on a controversial drug price transparency bill. Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California hide caption

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Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California

California Bill Would Compel Drugmakers To Justify Price Hikes

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Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Blend Images/Getty Images

Critics of Anthem's policy say imposing a blanket rule that gives preference to freestanding imaging centers is at odds with promoting quality and will lead to fragmented care for patients. Media for Medical/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Media for Medical/UIG/Getty Images

Health insurance company Oscar has started its own ad campaign for the Affordable Care Act. These enrollment dates apply to New York state; the dates to enroll in federally run exchanges are Nov. 1 to Dec. 15. Oscar Health hide caption

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Oscar Health

As Federal Government Cuts Obamacare Ads, Private Insurer Steps Up

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FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb says the agency will close a loophole that lets drug manufacturers skip pediatric testing in some drugs intended for children. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

A study of chemotherapy medicines produced by 10 companies found that, on average, each drug produced seven times as much revenue for its manufacturer as it cost in research and development. BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images

R&D Costs For Cancer Drugs Are Likely Much Less Than Industry Claims, Study Finds

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The Senate health committee meets next month to discuss ways to stabilize the insurance markets. Insurers have until Sept. 27 to commit to selling policies on the ACA marketplaces in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP