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Shots - Health News

Shots

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Drug companies often do one-on-one outreach to doctors. A new study finds these meetings with drug reps lead to more prescriptions for cancer patients, but not longer survival. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer

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The U.S. is the most lucrative market for drugmakers, but they often pay more in taxes overseas. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Drugmakers' low U.S. taxes belie their high sales

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Kevin Carlson, with nurse Joshua Lee (right) and respiratory therapist Eric Mathewson (left), watches a WWE match on October 2, 2023 in San Jose, Calif. Gabriel Torres hide caption

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Gabriel Torres

Miriam McDonald spends time with her 4-year-old son, Nico. McDonald struggled to get care for postpartum depression at Kaiser Permanente, an experience that would eventually lead to significant policy changes by the health care provider. Keith McDonald hide caption

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Keith McDonald

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, pressed executives from Bristol Myers Squibb, Merck and Johnson & Johnson about the prices they charge for drugs in the U.S. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Senators ask CEOs why their drugs cost so much more in the U.S.

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Chantal Panozzo and her husband, who live in the Chicago suburbs, expected their first routine colonoscopies would be free — fully covered by insurance as preventive care under federal law. Taylor Glascock/KFF Health News hide caption

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Taylor Glascock/KFF Health News

The colonoscopies were free but the 'surgical trays' came with $600 price tags

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Cook County board president Toni Preckwinkle (center) announces the county's debt relief program, along with executives from several local hospitals and Allison Sesso, President & CEO of RIP Medical Debt (far left). Cook County, Ill. hide caption

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Cook County, Ill.

A growing wave of local governments are erasing billions in medical debts

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McAlester Regional Health Center's administrative offices in McAlester, Oklahoma. Mitchell Black for KFF Health News hide caption

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Mitchell Black for KFF Health News

Drug price hikes appear to be moderate this year, with some drug prices falling. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

What to know about January's annual drug price hikes

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The Food And Drug Administration has given its OK to Florida's plan to import some prescription drugs from Canada. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

FDA approves Florida's plan to import cheaper drugs from Canada

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The former Akorn pharmaceutical plant in Decatur, Ill., that made a wide range of generic drugs used in hospitals is being reopened under new ownership. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

How rock-bottom prices drive shortages of generic drugs used in hospitals

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Anne Sansevero discusses a client with one of her nurses, Beau Romero. Sansevero has seven employees in her growing private care management business in New York City. Ashley Milne-Tyte/for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte/for NPR

These pros help keep ailing, aging loved ones safe — but it's a costly service

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Design strategist Anna Engstrom created this sketch of a futuristic hospital that appears in Artists Remaking Medicine. She writes that she envisions "a more colorful health care future." Anna Engstrom/Procedure Press hide caption

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Anna Engstrom/Procedure Press

Kayce Atencio, who has been shadowed by medical debt for most of his adult life, had been unable to rent an apartment because of poor credit due to medical debt, he said. Recent reporting changes by credit rating agencies have removed many debts from consumer credit reports and lifted scores for millions, a new study finds. Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News

Angels for Change founder Laura Bray took on the problem of drug shortages when the hospital ran out of the drug that her then-9-year-old daughter needed to treat her leukemia. Laura Bray hide caption

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Laura Bray

The hospital ran out of her child's cancer drug. Now she's fighting to end shortages

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Open enrollment for Medicare begins Sunday and ads like this billboard inside California's John Wayne Airport are popping up. Marketing of Medicare plans is subject to new, stricter federal regulations this year. Leslie Walker/Tradeoffs hide caption

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Leslie Walker/Tradeoffs

Rosalind Pichardo, who founded Operation Save Our City in Philadelphia, sprays a container of Narcan during a demonstration Sept. 8 at the Health and Human Services Humphrey Building in Washington, DC. Health officials held the event to mark the availability, without a prescription, of the opioid overdose-reversal drug. AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein hide caption

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AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

An overdose drug is finally over-the-counter. Is that enough to stop the death toll?

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