Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.

Air Methods' helicopter in Pocola, Okla. The company owns five other Oklahoma bases under the Tulsa Life Flight brand that it bought in 2009. Jackie Fortier/ StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/ StateImpact Oklahoma

Will Congress Bring Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills Down To Earth?

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Physicians face long hours, frustrating paperwork and sometimes difficult patients. But researchers aren't so clear on whether burnout is the right word to describe their problems. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Despite abuse deterrent formulation, Purdue Pharma's OxyContin continues to be used by some people with opioid addiction to get high. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Insurer To Purdue Pharma: We Won't Pay For OxyContin Anymore

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Intermountain Healthcare, whose Intermountain Medical Center Patient Tower in Murray, Utah, is seen here, is a leader in the generic drug company being launched by hospitals. Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare

Despite the political uncertainties, insurance companies have started to learn how to make a profit on the plans they offer through the Affordable Care Act. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Analysts Predict Health Care Marketplace Premiums Will Stabilize For 2019 Coverage

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A survey finds many Americans get unexpected medical bills and the majority come because patients expect their insurance to cover more than it actually does. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

"It shouldn't have happened," says Nicole Smith-Holt of Richfield, Minn., gazing at the death certificate of her son Alec Raeshawn Smith. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Insulin's High Cost Leads To Lethal Rationing

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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Wren Vetens fought to get her gender confirmation surgery covered after the Group Insurance Board's initial decision left her without insurance coverage. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Life-Threatening Heart Attack Leaves Teacher With $108,951 Bill

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Texas officials are requiring that people who comment at Medicaid meetings on pharmaceuticals disclose more details about their ties to industry. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images

Cashiers, cooks, delivery people, fast-food workers and their supporters rallied outside New York City Hall in 2017. Their influential union, the Service Employees International Union, also includes about half a million home health aides. Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images

Drug costs are the fastest growing part of state Medicaid budgets. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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asiseeit/Getty Images

States Question Costs Of Middlemen That Manage Medicaid Drug Benefits

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The results of genetic testing — whether done for health reasons or ancestry searches — can be used by insurance underwriters in evaluating an application for life insurance, or a disability or long-term-care policy. Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images

Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images
Paul Blow for NPR

Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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Justin Volz for ProPublica

Health Insurers Are Vacuuming Up Details About You — And It Could Raise Your Rates

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The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act still prohibits your insurer from using the results of genetic tests against you. But the ACA's additional protections may be in doubt if certain states get their way. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Struggling to stay afloat, a rural hospital in Missouri took a chance on new managers. Dan Margolies/KCUR hide caption

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Dan Margolies/KCUR

Vulnerable Rural Hospitals Face Tough Decisions On Questionable Billing Schemes

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Gilead Sciences makes Truvada, a medicine known generically as "pre-exposure prophylaxis," or PrEP. Consistent, daily doses of the drug are thought to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90 percent. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

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