Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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Anthem Blue Cross of California, one of the state's largest health insurers, is battling Sutter Health over how much it should pay the company's 24 hospitals and 5,000 doctors in Northern California to care for tens of thousands of patients. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Juul Labs, the maker of e-cigarettes popular with young, has come under fire from health officials. Since the spring of 2018 the company has been lobbying the federal government. Gabby Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Getty Images

A filing by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey detailed the Sackler family's role in Purdue Pharma's marketing of OxyContin. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Even for conventional medical treatments that are covered under most health insurance policies, the large copays and high deductibles have left many Americans with big bills, says a health economist, who sees the rise in medical fundraisers as worrisome. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Patients Are Turning To GoFundMe To Fill Health Insurance Gaps

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Susie Christoff tried several drugs to cope with her painful psoriatic arthritis before finding Cosentyx worked the best. The problem was the cost. Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News

Why The U.S. Remains The Most Expensive Market For 'Biologic' Drugs In The World

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The "Medicaid Drug Decisions Transparency Act" would require pharmaceutical companies to disclose their payments to pharmacists and others who serve on state Medicaid drug boards — the advisory groups that decide which drugs Medicaid will and won't cover. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

The deadline for signing up for individual health insurance coverage on HealthCare.gov ends Saturday, Dec. 15. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

Affordable Care Act Insurance Sign-Ups Fall Slightly For 2019

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Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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A business decision by UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurance carrier, to drop a popular fitness benefit has upset many people covered by the company's Medicare plans. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Medicare's new program will alter a year's worth of payments to 14,959 skilled nursing facilities across the U.S., based on how often in the past fiscal year their residents ended up back in hospitals within 30 days of leaving. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Getty Images

The Trump administration said Thursday it wants states to innovate in ways that could produce more lower-cost health insurance options — even if those alternatives do not provide the same level of financial or medical coverage as an ACA plan. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

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Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Dr. Kimberly Remski was told by a potential employer that she couldn't provide abortions during her free time, something she felt called to do. "I realized it was something I really needed to do," she says. Kim Kovacik for NPR hide caption

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Kim Kovacik for NPR

Ochsner Baptist Medical Center in New Orleans hasn't needed device reps' help since it started using technology from a company called Sight Medical that handles inventory management. Courtesy of Sight Medical hide caption

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Courtesy of Sight Medical

Sales Reps May Be Wearing Out Their Welcome In The Operating Room

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More than half of all counties in the 39 states that rely on the federal HealthCare.gov exchange for ACA health insurance are experiencing a 10 percent price decrease, on average, for their cheapest plan for 2019. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

Many Who Buy ACA Health Plans For 2019 Find Lower Prices And More Choice

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A CPAP machine can treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder which causes people to temporarily stop breathing throughout the night. But the machines, which blow air into a person's airways, take some getting used to. Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux/ProPublica
Katherine Streeter for NPR

A Search For New Ways To Pay For Drugs That Cost A Mint

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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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