Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.

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Daisha Smith says she only realized she had been sued over her hospital bill when she saw her paycheck was being garnished. "I literally have no food in my house because they're garnishing my check," she says. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

When Hospitals Sue For Unpaid Bills, It Can Be 'Ruinous' For Patients

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Patients operated on by surgeons who display rude or unprofessional behavior toward colleagues tend to have higher rates of post-surgical complications. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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Gov. Ron DeSantis signed Florida's prescription drug importation program into law last week at The Villages, a large retirement community outside Orlando. Florida Governor's Press Office hide caption

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Florida Governor's Press Office

Florida Wants To Import Medicine From Canada. But How Would That Work?

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A new Texas law aims to protect patients like Drew Calver, pictured here with his wife, Erin, and daughters, Eleanor (left) and Emory, in their Austin, Texas, home. After being treated for a heart attack in April 2017, Calver, a high school history teacher, got a surprise medical bill for $108,951. Callie Richmond for KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond for KHN

Texas Is Latest State To Attack Surprise Medical Bills

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In many rural areas, helicopters are the only speedy way to get patients to a trauma center or hospital burn unit. As more than 100 rural hospitals have closed around the U.S. since 2010, the need for air transport has only increased. Ollo/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollo/Getty Images

Bonnielin Swenor, an assistant professor of ophthalmology, has myopic macular degeneration. It hasn't stopped her from having a prolific career as a researcher and epidemiologist. But until recently, she rarely discussed her disability with her peers, worried they would judge or dismiss her. Christopher Myers hide caption

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Christopher Myers
Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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At least 43 million Americans have overdue medical bills on their credit reports, according to a 2014 report on medical debt by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption

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Zolgensma, a new drug approved by the FDA Friday, costs more than $2.1 million. It's made by AveXis, a drugmaker owned by pharmaceutical giant Novartis. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever

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Errors in reading diagnostic images like MRIs or CT scans can lead to unnecessary and costly medical procedures. Walmart is pushing its employees to use a vetted list of high-quality imaging centers to avoid errors. HadelProductions/Getty Images hide caption

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HadelProductions/Getty Images

A new book, Bottle of Lies, reveals serious safety and purity concerns about the global generic-drug supply. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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The Generic Drugs You're Taking May Not Be As Safe Or Effective As You Think

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Pharmacy technician Peggy Gillespie fills a syringe with an antibiotic at ProMedica Toledo Hospital in Toledo, Ohio, in January. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

Drugmaker Created To Reduce Shortages And Prices Unveils Its First Products

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