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Shots - Health News

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President Biden inspects COVID-19 vaccine freezers at a Pfizer plant in Kalamazoo, Mich., with White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Jeffrey Zients, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla on Feb. 19. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna And Pfizer On Track To Hit Vaccine Production Goals

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in partnership with Boston Children's Hospital and Castlight Health launched a new tool that allows Americans to search for COVID-19 vaccine providers with stock of vaccine where they live. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

CDC Launches Web Tool To Help Americans Find COVID-19 Vaccines

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A worker carries boxes containing the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine that were being prepared for shipment from a Pfizer facility in Portage, Mich., in December. Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images

Moderna Increases COVID-19 Vaccine Shipments While Pfizer Lags Behind

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Mikkel and Kayla Kjelshus' daughter, Charlie, had a complication during delivery that caused her oxygen levels to drop and put her at risk for brain damage. Charlie needed seven days of neonatal intensive care, which resulted in a huge bill — $207,455 for the NICU alone — and confusion over which parent's insurer would cover the little girl's health costs. Christopher Smith for KHN hide caption

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Christopher Smith for KHN

'Birthday Rule' Blindsides First-Time Parents With A Mammoth Medical Bill

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A health worker holds an N95 respirator in the emergency room at OakBend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas, in July. N95s are tested and approved by a federal agency as having demonstrated that they can filter out a minimum of 95% of airborne particles. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

An illustration shows medical student Elizabeth Blackwell at Geneva Medical College (later Hobart College) in upstate New York, as she eyes a note dropped onto her arm by a male student, during a lecture in the college's operating room. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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'Doctors Blackwell' Tells The Story Of 2 Pioneering Sisters Who Changed Medicine

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People line up on Thursday for the first day of Clark County's pilot COVID-19 vaccination program at Cashman Center in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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COVID-19 Supply Deal Lets Vaccine Maker Earmark Doses For Employees And Their Families

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Nurses at Albany Medical Center picketed on Dec.1, asking for more personal protective equipment. They say they're having to reuse N95 masks up to 20 times. Hans Pennink hide caption

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Hans Pennink

While waiting for a liver transplant in 2011, 21-year-old Matthew Rosiello (shown here getting catheter help from his mom while he was on the waitlist) was advised by his doctors to relocate from New York to Ohio — where the wait would be shorter. Indeed, in 2012 Rosiello received a liver transplant in Cleveland. AP Photo/Craig Ruttle hide caption

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AP Photo/Craig Ruttle

Organ Donation Nonprofits Face New Scrutiny Under Trump Administration Rules

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Congress passed a measure to curb surprise medical bills as part of the pandemic stimulus deal. Oliver Contreras/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A worker passes through the security gate at the Moderna campus in Norwood, Mass., one of the sites where the biotechnology company is manufacturing its COVID-19 vaccine. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

How Will Moderna Meet The Demand For Its COVID-19 Vaccine?

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A vial of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech that was used at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, U.K., on Tuesday. Liam McBurney/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Liam McBurney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

All health plans sold on HealthCare.Gov or one of state insurance exchanges are governed by Affordable Care Act rules. That means they have to provide comprehensive benefits to all applicants, regardless of their health or "preexisting conditions." But short-term plans and many others aren't bound by such restrictions. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Headaches, lung issues and ongoing, debilitating fatigue are just a few of the symptoms plaguing some "long hauler" COVID-19 patients for months or more after the initial fever and acute symptoms recede. Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Grace Cary/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services on Saturday made public several contracts with companies working on COVID-19 vaccines as part of Operation Warp Speed. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A pre-pandemic Seattle supermarket boasts row after row of prepackaged snacks. Even before the coronavirus pandemic put extra stress on grocery workers, keeping shelves stocked with the variety that Americans have come to expect took a hidden toll on producers, distributors and retail workers, says author Benjamin Lorr. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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Regeneron has developed a drug called REGN-COV2 that is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that block the virus that causes COVID-19. The company has a contract to supply up to 300 million doses to the U.S. government. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Moncef Slaoui, a former GlaxoSmithKline executive, speaks during the kickoff announcement for Operation Warp Speed in the White House Rose Garden on May 15. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

After Months Of Questions, A Key Operation Warp Speed Adviser's Contract Emerges

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When Tiffany Qiu found herself on the hook for her usual 30% Blue Shield of California coinsurance after the hospital quoted 20%, she pushed back. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Hit With An Unexpectedly High Medical Bill, Here's How A Savvy Patient Fought Back

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On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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Shots - Health News

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