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Shots - Health News

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Costs have gone up for addiction treatment centers in recent months, as they have had to invest in teletherapy and personal protective gear. "We are at risk for not having the funding that we need to keep our doors open," says one medical director. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

A New Addiction Crisis: Treatment Centers Face Financial Collapse

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The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection in May. Pfizer's candidate for a coronavirus vaccine is one of number that are in various stages of development around the world. University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End

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Dr. Ming Lin was fired from his position as an emergency room physician at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington after publicly complaining about the hospital's infection control procedures during the pandmic. Yoshimi Lin hide caption

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Yoshimi Lin

Anna Davis Abel, a graduate student studying creative writing at West Virginia University, couldn't get tested for COVID-19 until her doctor ruled out other possible illnesses. Rebecca Kiger for KHN hide caption

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Rebecca Kiger for KHN

COVID-19 Tests That Are Supposed To Be Free Can Ring Up Surprising Charges

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Despite recent changes in insurance policy, some patients say doctors and insurers are charging them upfront for video appointments and phone calls — not just copays but sometimes the entire cost of the visit, even if it's covered by insurance. sesame/Getty Images hide caption

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sesame/Getty Images

Only 28% of the factories that make active ingredients for pharmaceuticals for the domestic market are located in the U.S., according to the Food and Drug Administration. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

All 84 residents of Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Riverside, Calif., were evacuated from the facility in early April after 39 residents tested positive for the coronavirus. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Discharging COVID-19 Patients To Nursing Homes Called A 'Recipe For Disaster'

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Emergency medical technicians wheel a patient into the ER of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Emergency hospitalizations related to COViD-19 can be costly. Fine print in the HHS rules regarding the CARES Act seem to spare patients at least some of the financial pain. Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Paramedics and hospital workers prepare to lift a COVID-19 patient onto a hospital stretcher outside the Montefiore Medical Center Moses Campus in the Bronx, Tuesday, April 07, 2020, New York City. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Tents setup outside the main entrance to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif., Wednesday, April 1, 2020. The hospital plans to triple the number of available ICU beds to care for patients amidst the spread of COVID-19. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Image hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Image

While more affluent parts of Nashville have had testing sites for weeks, this drive-through testing site at Meharry Medical College, in a historically African American neighborhood, experienced weeks of delays because staff couldn't acquire the needed testing supplies and gear like masks and gloves. It finally opened March 30. Ken Morris/Meharry Medical College hide caption

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Ken Morris/Meharry Medical College

The Coronavirus Doesn't Discriminate, But U.S. Health Care Showing Familiar Biases

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Aetna was the first insurer to announce its plan to help shield patients with COVID-19 from high medical bills. But out-of-network charges and other surprise bills remain a risk, say advocates for patients. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

After an initial verbal screening, one driver at a time gets a COVID-19 nasal swab test from a garbed health worker at a drive-up station in Daly City, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mary Mills, longtime intensive care nurse, feels the response to coronavirus at her Seattle hospital has been haphazard. She worries the growing number of patients will overwhelm the ICUs in the coming days. Will Stone/for NPR hide caption

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Will Stone/for NPR

Drive-through screening stations are opening up in several parts of the country as testing capacity starts to expand nationally. At one station in Meridian, Idaho, nurse Ashley Layton communicates with a patient before taking a swab sample. Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

U.S. Coronavirus Testing Starts To Ramp Up But Still Lags

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Medical personnel use specialized swabs to gather samples to test for coronavirus, such as at this drive-through COVID-19 testing station in Seattle. The supply of these swabs is getting tight. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Until very recently, the separate company that runs the emergency department at Nashville General Hospital was continuing to haul patients who couldn't pay medical bills into court. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

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Lobbying by physicians and physicians' professional associations has influenced proposed legislation to curtail surprise billing. Hannah Norman/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Hannah Norman/Kaiser Health News

Doctors Push Back As Congress Takes Aim At Surprise Medical Bills

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Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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