Public Health : Shots - Health News When the neighborhood, town or nation is the patient, we're on the case. Find out about health in the community and around the globe. We round up the latest on prevention, disease outbreaks and the world's response to health crises.

At safe injection sites like Insite, in Vancouver, Canada, drug users can inject drugs under the watch of trained medical staff who will help in case of overdose. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Cities Planning Supervised Drug Injection Sites Fear Justice Department Reaction

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Research shows that people taken to an emergency room after a suicide attempt are at high risk of another attempt in the next several months. But providing them with a simple "safety plan" before discharge reduced that risk by as much as 50 percent. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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Behind Bars, Mentally Ill Inmates Are Often Punished For Their Symptoms

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Shannon Hubbard has complex regional pain syndrome and considers herself lucky that her doctor hasn't cut back her pain prescription dosage. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Patients With Chronic Pain Feel Caught In An Opioid Prescribing Debate

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Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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During his life, Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was known not only for his novels, but for his scientific research and public health advocacy. Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum hide caption

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Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum

Some firefighters, paramedics and police officers say the tragedies they respond to haunt them, leading to depression, job burnout, substance abuse, and more. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

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Unlike the three-year residency programs that doctors must generally complete after medical school in order to practice medicine, nurse practitioner residency programs, sometimes called fellowships, are completely voluntary. Antenna/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha spearheaded efforts to publicize and address the water crisis in Flint, Mich. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Pediatrician Who Exposed Flint Water Crisis Shares Her 'Story Of Resistance'

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If you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it. Robert Noonan/Science Source hide caption

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Robert Noonan/Science Source

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

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Hepatitis C virus is typically transmitted through blood, but an infected person who spits at someone can run afoul of the law in some jurisdictions. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

A 4-year-old Honduran girl carries a doll while walking with her immigrant mother. Both were released Sunday from federal detention in McAllen, Texas. Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Separating Kids From Their Parents Can Lead To Long-Term Health Problems

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Border Patrol agents take a father and son from Honduras into custody near the U.S.-Mexico border. The asylum seekers were then sent to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing center for possible separation. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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A Pediatrician Reports Back From A Visit To A Children's Shelter Near The Border

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Main Street in McArthur in Vinton County, Ohio. Though the opioid crisis endures in Ohio, the problem is now compounded by the resurgence of methamphetamine addiction. Arezou Rezvani/NPR hide caption

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Teachers See the Effects of the Opioid Crisis On Children

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Yvette and Scott, both recovering heroin users, now take methadone daily from a clinic in the Southend of Boston. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

After An Overdose, Patients Aren't Getting Treatments That Could Prevent The Next One

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Helping those who are suffering know they are not alone is one step toward suicide prevention, researchers say. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Getty Images

U.S. Suicide Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men

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Patchen has been a midwife for twenty years and is the founder of the Teen Alliance for Prepared Parenting or TAPP at Medstar Washington Hospital Center. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Where The Need Is': Tackling Teen Pregnancy With A Midwife At School

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CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'

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Dawn Charlton, an instructor with Being Adept, leads a discussion on marijuana for sixth-graders at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, California. Carrie Feibel/KQED hide caption

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With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From 'Don't' to 'Delay'

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