Public Health : Shots - Health News When the neighborhood, town or nation is the patient, we're on the case. Find out about health in the community and around the globe. We round up the latest on prevention, disease outbreaks and the world's response to health crises.

Mother Daniele Santos holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, on May 30, 2016, in Recife, Brazil. Researchers are now learning that Zika's effects can appear up to a year after birth. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Babies Who Seem Fine At Birth May Have Zika-Related Problems Later, Study Finds

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Northern California's River Fire tore through a canyon near the town of Lakeport early last week, filling orange-tinged skies with smoke for miles around. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

California Wildfires Reignite Old Trauma For Survivors Of Last Year's Blazes

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With financial aid declining, many college students can't afford to eat, studies show, even though about 40 percent are also working. Nearly 1 in 4 college students are parents, which can add to their financial stress. franckreporter/Getty Images hide caption

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Emergency room doctors face long-term stress, making them especially prone to depression and suicide. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

When Doctors Struggle With Suicide, Their Profession Often Fails Them

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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Girard Children's Community Garden in Washington, D.C. was created on a vacant lot and is now a thriving community space for neighborhood kids, many of whom are from low-income communities of color. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities

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A homeless man in Denver draws heroin into a syringe. Treatment centers in the city say patterns of drug use seem to be changing. While most users once relied on a single drug — typically painkillers or heroin or cocaine — an increasing number now also use meth. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

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A drug user prepares a hit of heroin inside VANDU's supervised injection room. Rafal Gerszak for NPR hide caption

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Rafal Gerszak for NPR

Watchful Eyes: At Peer-Run Injection Sites, Drug Users Help Each Other Stay Safe

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At safe injection sites like Insite, in Vancouver, Canada, drug users can inject drugs under the watch of trained medical staff who will help in case of overdose. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Cities Planning Supervised Drug Injection Sites Fear Justice Department Reaction

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Research shows that people taken to an emergency room after a suicide attempt are at high risk of another attempt in the next several months. But providing them with a simple "safety plan" before discharge reduced that risk by as much as 50 percent. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Behind Bars, Mentally Ill Inmates Are Often Punished For Their Symptoms

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Shannon Hubbard has complex regional pain syndrome and considers herself lucky that her doctor hasn't cut back her pain prescription dosage. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Patients With Chronic Pain Feel Caught In An Opioid Prescribing Debate

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Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images

During his life, Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was known not only for his novels, but for his scientific research and public health advocacy. Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum hide caption

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Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum

Some firefighters, paramedics and police officers say the tragedies they respond to haunt them, leading to depression, job burnout, substance abuse, and more. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

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Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

Unlike the three-year residency programs that doctors must generally complete after medical school in order to practice medicine, nurse practitioner residency programs, sometimes called fellowships, are completely voluntary. Antenna/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Antenna/fStop/Getty Images

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha spearheaded efforts to publicize and address the water crisis in Flint, Mich. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Pediatrician Who Exposed Flint Water Crisis Shares Her 'Story Of Resistance'

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If you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it. Robert Noonan/Science Source hide caption

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Robert Noonan/Science Source

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

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