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Shots - Health News

Shots

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A box of vaping products confiscated from students or thrown away at Boulder High School. The school's assistant principal collects items for later delivery to the county's hazardous waste facility. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

Don't Toss That E-Cig: Vaping Waste Is A Whole New Headache For Schools and Cities

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The MX908 can check for the presence of fentanyl mixed with other drugs and such testing may help prevent overdoses. Sarah Mackin of the Boston Public Health Commission prepares the machine for testing some samples. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Built For Counterterrorism, This High-Tech Machine Is Now Helping Fight Fentanyl

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Licensed practical nurse Stephanie Dotson measures Kent Beasley's blood pressure in downtown Atlanta in September. Dotson is a member of the Mercy Care team that works to bring medical care to Atlanta residents who are homeless. Bita Honarvar for WABE hide caption

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Bita Honarvar for WABE

They Bring Medical Care To The Homeless And Build Relationships To Save Lives

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Samples of Silestone, a countertop material made of quartz. Cutting the material releases dangerous silica dust that can damage people's lungs if the exposure to the dust is not properly controlled. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

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Getting a handle on evolving vape culture means exploring the complex realm of subspecialists: "cloud chasers," "coil builders" and other people who identify as vape modders. Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images

Mourners hold candles as they gather for a vigil at a memorial outside Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said Friday that fluid extracted from the lungs of 29 injured patients who vaped all contained the chemical compound vitamin E acetate. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Cover detail of Volume Control, by David Owen. Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

From Lawn Mowers To Rock Concerts, Our 'Deafening World' Is Hurting Our Ears

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During recent blackouts in California, people like Fern Brown (left) and her sister, Lavina Suehead, came to a pop-up community center at the Auburn, Calf., fairgrounds to use electricity. Brown, 81, needed a treatment for her chronic lung condition. Mark Kreidler/California Healthline hide caption

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Mark Kreidler/California Healthline

Vanderbilt University professor John Geer sits for a video-taped deposition in 2014, defending his expert witness report which backed up the tobacco industry position that smokers knew of the health risks of smoking as early as the mid-1950s. Academics often provide testimony for the industry. Kenneth Byrd hide caption

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Kenneth Byrd

Some Academics Quietly Take Side Jobs Helping Tobacco Companies In Court

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Outside of risks from the fire's heat — and any health risks related to a long-term power outage — the main health concern in wildfire conditions is smoke, which produces particulate matter that can penetrate deep into the lungs, increasing the risk of respiratory diseases and asthma, as well as heart problems. Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN hide caption

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Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN

A flyer reminding customers about vaping-related deaths and illnesses, on display in a Seattle vape store. The Washington State Board of Health recently passed a four-month emergency ban on flavored vaping products. It applies to products that contain either THC or nicotine. Jovelle Tamayo/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta has mobilized more than 140 scientists and other staffers to investigate the causes of vaping-related lung injuries and deaths. Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source hide caption

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Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source

Behind The Scenes Of CDC's Vaping Investigation

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This year the Drug Enforcement Administration is accepting electronic vaping devices (provided any lithium ion batteries are removed) during its annual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Though there are websites, hotlines, therapists and coaches to help teens manage nicotine cravings, there's been little research to show what works best. Recently, some programs have turned to texting to help kids find resources specific to vaping cessation. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Teen Vapers Who Want To Quit Look For Help Via Text

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Officer Brian Cregg checks in with a man who says he is homeless and living in his car in Concord, N.H. In Concord, as in many parts of the Northeast, widespread use of meth is new, police say, and is changing how they approach interactions with people who seem to be delusional. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Is It A Meth Case Or Mental Illness? Police Who Need To Know Often Can't Tell

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Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

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