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Shots - Health News

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A medical worker puts on a mask before entering a negative pressure room with a COVID-19 patient in the ICU ward at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass., last week. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Yanna McGraw is one of about a dozen full-time social workers working at libraries across the Midwest. A representative of the Public Library Association says over the past decade, more libraries have been finding ways to partner with social workers. Darian Benson/WFYI hide caption

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Darian Benson/WFYI

People form a large crowd as they attempt to receive COVID-19 testing kits from city workers distributing the kits along Flatbush Avenue on December 24, 2021 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The city is handing out thousands of the kits, which include two tests per box, in order to lesson the surge of people in long lines at testing sites. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Yaritza Martinez developed a Zika virus infection in 2016 when she was pregnant with her son Yariel, who is now 5 years old. Yariel is enrolled in a long-term study following a group of babies in the U.S. and in Colombia to see how they have been developing. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

5 years later, researchers assess how children exposed to Zika are developing

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A team of nurses, patient care technicians and a respiratory therapist prepare to return a COVID patient to their back after 24 hours of lying on their stomach. That posture makes it easier to breathe and is a critical part of treatment for COVID patients in hospitals. Alan Hawes/Medical University of South Carolina hide caption

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Alan Hawes/Medical University of South Carolina

Intimate portraits of a hospital COVID unit from a photojournalist-turned-nurse

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People line up outside a free COVID-19 vaccination site on Dec. 3 in Washington, D.C. Many areas are stepping up vaccination and booster shots as more cases of the omicron variant of the coronavirus are detected in the United States. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Omicron could bring the worst surge of COVID yet in the U.S. — and fast

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People wear face coverings inside Grand Central Market on Wednesday in Los Angeles. California residents, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status, are required to wear face masks in all indoor public settings beginning Wednesday. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

As omicron spreads, health experts push for mask mandates. But few states have one

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Louise Vincent, executive director of the North Carolina Survivors Union, holds a vial of the overdose reversal drug naloxone. "Almost everyone that comes here is alive because of naloxone," Vincent says. Aneri Pattani/KHN hide caption

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Aneri Pattani/KHN

The wastewater facility in San Jose, Calif., processes sewage from about 1.4 million people and 22,000 businesses. The facility is part of a network of communities testing their wastewater for the omicron variant of the coronavirus. Raquel Maria DIllon/KQED hide caption

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Raquel Maria DIllon/KQED

Poop sleuths hunt for early signs of omicron in sewage

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National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins served for 12 years under three presidents and presided over an expansion of the agency's budget and efforts to develop new cures to diseases. Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The NIH director on why Americans aren't getting healthier, despite medical advances

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Members of the Black Equity Coalition, a grassroots team of researchers and advocates, meet regularly to discuss how they can use data to uncover life-threatening disparities between white and Black Pittsburgh. Clockwise, from top left are Kellie Ware, Karen Abrams, Tiffany Gary-Webb, Mark Lewis and Fred Brown. Martha Rial hide caption

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Martha Rial
Daniel Wood/NPR

Pro-Trump counties now have far higher COVID death rates. Misinformation is to blame

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Dr. Matifadza Hlatshwayo Davis, who directs the St. Louis Department of Health, has turned to social media platforms this week and to local clergy and community groups — the sort of trusted messengers people turn to in times of uncertainty — to help get the right sort of early word out about the omicron variant. Conveying what's known and what's still to be learned are both important, she says. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Sending the right message about the omicron variant is tricky

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A registered nurse stirs a nasal swab in testing solution after administering a COVID-19 test in Los Angeles, Calif. Increased testing could help in efforts to detect and track new variants like omicron. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Native tribes have responded to the pandemic with creative ways to stay connected. Veronica Concho and Raymond Concho Jr. grew traditional Pueblo foods and Navajo crops with their grandchildren Kaleb and Kateri Allison-Burbank in Waterflow, N.M. Joshuaa Allison-Burbank hide caption

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Joshuaa Allison-Burbank

After two student suicides over one October weekend, UNC students created a makeshift memorial on the Chapel Hill campus. To reduce the risk of suicide contagion, any memorial sites or activities should be limited, experts say, and should not glorify, vilify or stigmatize the deceased student or their death. Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel hide caption

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Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel

University of Kansas undergraduate Marc Veloz speaks at an environmental rally outside Lawrence city hall. He says his interest in activism was driven by concern over the disproportionate effect climate change had on communities of color in his hometown of Dallas. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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As climate worsens, environmentalists also grapple with the mental toll of activism

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Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administers a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot to Chen Knifsend at a vaccination clinic in San Rafael, Calif., in October. The companies are seeking regulatory authorization to expand boosters to everyone 18 and older. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Pfizer and BioNTech ask FDA to authorize COVID vaccine booster for people 18+

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Left to right: Filipino American health care workers Karen Cantor, Karen Shoker, and John Paul Atienza were among many who cared for COVID patients in the early days of the pandemic. Rosem Morton hide caption

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Rosem Morton
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