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Native tribes have responded to the pandemic with creative ways to stay connected. Veronica Concho and Raymond Concho Jr. grew traditional Pueblo foods and Navajo crops with their grandchildren Kaleb and Kateri Allison-Burbank in Waterflow, N.M. Joshuaa Allison-Burbank hide caption

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Joshuaa Allison-Burbank

After two student suicides over one October weekend, UNC students created a makeshift memorial on the Chapel Hill campus. To reduce the risk of suicide contagion, any memorial sites or activities should be limited, experts say, and should not glorify, vilify or stigmatize the deceased student or their death. Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel hide caption

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Ira Wilder/Daily Tar Heel

University of Kansas undergraduate Marc Veloz speaks at an environmental rally outside Lawrence city hall. He says his interest in activism was driven by concern over the disproportionate effect climate change had on communities of color in his hometown of Dallas. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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Carlos Moreno/KCUR

As climate worsens, environmentalists also grapple with the mental toll of activism

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Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administers a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot to Chen Knifsend at a vaccination clinic in San Rafael, Calif., in October. The companies are seeking regulatory authorization to expand boosters to everyone 18 and older. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Pfizer and BioNTech ask FDA to authorize COVID vaccine booster for people 18+

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Left to right: Filipino American health care workers Karen Cantor, Karen Shoker, and John Paul Atienza were among many who cared for COVID patients in the early days of the pandemic. Rosem Morton hide caption

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Rosem Morton

Hattie Pierce, 75, receives a Pfizer covid-19 vaccine booster shot from Dr. Tiffany Taliaferro at the Safeway on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Monday, October 4, 2021. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

A long-running decline in COVID-19 cases nationally masks some trouble spots emerging in the upper half of the United States. The disease is hitting states in the Mountain West such as Colorado, Utah and Wyoming especially hard, but even parts of the Northeast have dealt with a worrying surge in cases and hospitalizations. Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for young children is a lower-dose formulation of the companies' adult vaccine. It was found to be safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing COVID-19. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Mai Yang, a communicable disease specialist, searches for Angelica, a 27 year-old pregnant woman who tested positive for syphilis, in order to get her treated before she delivers her baby. Talia Herman for ProPublica hide caption

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Talia Herman for ProPublica

Syphilis is resurging in the U.S., a sign of public health's funding crisis

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A health care worker administers a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to a child at a pediatrician's office in Bingham Farms, Michigan. Federal agencies are considering whether to start giving the vaccine to children ages 5 to 11 in the near future. Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Los Angeles International Airport and SoFi Stadium employers spoke with potential job applicants at a job fair in Inglewood, Calif., in September. About 19% of all households in an NPR poll say they lost all their savings during the COVID-19 outbreak, and have none to fall back on. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR
Dan Wood/NPR

What to know about your risk of a serious or fatal breakthrough COVID infection

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Pastor Billy Joe Lewis was all in favor when a local health worker suggested a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in the parking lot of his church in Smilax, Ky. "We've still got to use common sense," Lewis says. "Anything that can ward off suffering and death, I think, is a wonderful thing." Jessica Tezak for KHN hide caption

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Jessica Tezak for KHN

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

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Demonstrators march during a protest against Asian hate in Times Square in New York in March after a troubling spike in violence against the Asian American community during the coronavirus pandemic. Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

With racial attacks on the rise, Asian Americans fear for their safety

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