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Shots - Health News

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A bookmark advertising the 988 suicide and crisis lifeline emergency telephone number displayed by a volunteer with the Natrona County Suicide Prevention Task Force, in Casper, Wyoming on August 14, 2022. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Workers typically rely on plastic hard hat styles designed in the 1960s. But newer technology does a better job at protecting brains, especially from oblique impact caused by falls. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

How a new hard hat technology can protect workers better from concussion

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A third-grader punches in her student identification to pay for a meal at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. During the pandemic, schools were able to offer free school meals to all children regardless of need. Now advocates want to make that policy permanent. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP

As kids return to school this fall, educators are prepared to deal with the continued mental health fallout of the disruptions of the pandemic. martinedoucet/Getty Images hide caption

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martinedoucet/Getty Images

As school starts, teachers add a mental-health check-in to their lesson plans

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Vials of the reformulated Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster move through production at a plant in Kalamazoo, Mich. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.

CDC recommends new booster shots to fight omicron

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Vials of the newly reformulated COVID-19 vaccine booster are being readied by Pfizer for distribution now that the Food and Drug Administration has authorized the shots for people 12 and older. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.

Physician Assistant Susan Eng-Na, right, administers a monkeypox vaccine during a vaccination clinic in New York. New cases are starting to decline in New York and some other U.S. cities. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

The monkeypox outbreak may be slowing in the U.S., but health officials urge caution

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Call center specialist Michael Colluccio works on a team that answers 988 calls from people whose phones have area codes for the suburban Philadelphia region. If needed, Colluccio also can answer calls from other parts of the state or country, part of a system that makes sure someone is always available to talk. Brett Sholtis/WITF hide caption

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Brett Sholtis/WITF

At 988 call centers, crisis counselors offer empathy — and juggle limited resources

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This carefully-worded and designed infographic from Rockland County, NY describes — in English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, and Yiddish — what polio is and that immunization is the best way to protect yourself and others. Ari Daniel for NPR hide caption

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Ari Daniel for NPR

New York counties gear up to fight a polio outbreak among the unvaccinated

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Reagan Gaona stands beside the Unfillable Chair memorial in front of Santa Fe High School in Texas. The memorial is dedicated to the eight students and two teachers killed in a May 2018 shooting. To the left is a sign displaying solidarity with Uvalde, Texas, a city that experienced a similar school shooting in May 2022. Renuka Rayasam/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Renuka Rayasam/Kaiser Health News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laid out new guidance for the national response to COVID-19 on Thursday. Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images

With new guidance, CDC ends test-to-stay for schools and relaxes COVID rules

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A room in a Planned Parenthood of Illinois clinic in Waukegan, where abortion providers from Wisconsin are helping to provide access to more patients from their home state now that abortion is nearly banned there. Manuel Martinez/WBEZ hide caption

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Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

Abortion is legal in Illinois. In Wisconsin, it's nearly banned. So clinics teamed up

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Only when the caller cannot or will not collaborate on a safety plan and the counselor feels the caller will harm themselves imminently should emergency services be called, according to the hotline's policy. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images

Social media posts warn people not to call 988. Here's what you need to know

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Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

Their mentor was attacked. Now young OB-GYNs may leave Indiana

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Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm

A team of volunteers with an Ohio-based nonprofit handed out 2,500 doses of a nasal spray version of naloxone, an overdose reversal drug, at this year's Bonnaroo music festival. Amy Harris/Invision via AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision via AP

Vintage and new items from discount stores may contain lead and can be especially dangerous for children, who often put their hands in their mouths after touching anything within reach. Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom hide caption

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Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom

Kyle Planck, who has recovered from a painful case of monkeypox, has joined advocacy groups and pleaded with elected officials to make the antiviral pills TPOXX more available. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

Getting monkeypox treatment is easier, but still daunting and confusing

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Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby girl due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Because of Texas abortion law, her wanted pregnancy became a medical nightmare

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The FDA is trying to make "bivalent" COVID vaccines, which target two different antigens, available as soon as September. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Reformulated COVID vaccine boosters may be available earlier than expected

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Shots - Health News

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