Public Health : Shots - Health News When the neighborhood, town or nation is the patient, we're on the case. Find out about health in the community and around the globe. We round up the latest on prevention, disease outbreaks and the world's response to health crises.
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

Public Health

Leitha Dollarhyde, a retired caregiver who lives in a rural town near Whitesburg, Ky., says she could not afford an unexpected $1,000 expense. Sydney Boles for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sydney Boles for NPR

Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/725059882/725299999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Band-aid at the ready, Sara McRae, a medical assistant at Unity Health Care, heads in to vaccinate a pediatric patient. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

The Other Reasons Kids Aren't Getting Vaccinations: Poverty And Health Care Access

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724468630/725139755" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The increase in suicide rates was highest for girls ages 10 to 14, rising by nearly 13% since 2007. While for boys of the same age, it rose by 7%. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Xu for NPR

Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724299570/724433353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Studies have shown that the levels of THC, the main psychoactive compound in pot, rose dramatically in the U.S. from 1995 to 2017. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

Highly Potent Weed Has Swept The Market, Raising Concerns About Health Risks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/723656629/723686101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Many people might not be aware of what types of vaccines they need as they get older. Here, an adult gets a flu shot in Jacksonville, Fla. Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You

Fort Scott, Kan., fills up on weekday afternoons as locals grab pizza, visit a coffeehouse or browse antique shops and a bookstore. Like other rural communities, the commercial areas also include empty storefronts. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: How A Kansas Town Is Grappling With Its Hospital's Closure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/722199393/724234240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Signs advertising free measles vaccines and providing information about measles are displayed at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. The county in New York City's northern suburbs has had more than 200 measles cases since last fall. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

Black mothers are more likely than white mothers to die during pregnancy or delivery or in the year following. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

toggle caption
JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Buprenorphine, better known by the brand name Suboxone, helps people with opioid addiction stay in recovery. But it is prescribed far more often to white drug users than to blacks. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721447601/721552561" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new book explores the psychological harms of domestic violence. Nanette Hoogslag/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nanette Hoogslag/Getty Images/Ikon Images

'No Visible Bruises' Upends Stereotypes Of Abuse, Sheds Light On Domestic Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721005929/721114627" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/KHN

Many jails and prisons won't give prisoners buprenorphine, a drug which controls heroin and opioid cravings, known also by the brand name Suboxone. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Amendola/AP

Kim has been living at the Epiphany Center, a treatment facility in San Francisco for women struggling with addiction, for the past six months. She says her teddy bear is her only material possession left from her past: "Because everything I had, I've lost over and over again." April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
April Dembosky/KQED

As Meth Use Surges, First Responders Struggle To Help Those In Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716404677/718927723" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Measles used to be a common childhood disease, but after an effective vaccine was developed, the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. This year's outbreaks, however, put that status in jeopardy. solidcolours/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
solidcolours/Getty Images

The Brady Bunch, circa 1970, with oldest sister Marcia seated in front. In one episode of the show from 1969, the sisters and brothers all stay home from school with measles. ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images

'Brady Bunch' Episode Fuels Campaigns Against Vaccines — And Marcia's Miffed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/717595757/717970556" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gail Gray suffers from degenerative disk disease and takes daily painkillers. Her pharmacist was arrested in a recent federal justice department sting. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

toggle caption
Blake Farmer/WPLN

Amid Opioid Prescriber Crackdown, Health Officials Reach Out To Pain Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/715194105/715266732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up to a system that the Yale University researchers call BrainEx. Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/714289322/714413456" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y. Several measles outbreaks in New York state are contributing to this year's unusually high measles rates. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Measles Outbreak 'Accelerates,' Health Officials Warn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713508519/713616977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Teen romance gone wrong can be dangerous for girls. Around 7 percent of teen homicides between 2003 and 2016 were committed by intimate partners, and girls were the victims in 90 percent of those deaths. Ross Anania/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ross Anania/Getty Images

Safehouse is considering locating in this block of Hilton Street in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. The proposed facility would allow drug users to inject under medical supervision. The neighborhood is known for its drug use. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Supporters Sue To Open Safe Injection Site In Philadelphia, Citing Religious Freedom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710253334/712997082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shots - Health News

Shots

Health News From NPR

About