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Shots - Health News

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With new infections rising across the country, states are struggling to slow the spread, and testing can barely keep up. Here, people line up outside a coronavirus testing site this month in New York. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Catherine Coleman Flowers is the founding director of the Alabama Center for Rural Enterprise. Michael Carson/The New Press hide caption

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Michael Carson/The New Press

'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

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Saint Luke's Hospital of Kansas City is one of the 18 hospitals in the Saint Luke's Health System. Two-thirds of the COVID-19 patients transferred to Saint Luke's from rural areas need intensive care. "We get the sickest of the sick," says Dr. Marc Larsen. Carlos Moreno/KCUR hide caption

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Carlos Moreno/KCUR

Rural Areas Send Their Sickest Patients To The Cities, Straining Hospital Capacity

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Medical staff members check on a patient at the COVID-19 ICU in United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas. Cases and hospitalizations rose dramatically in the U.S. this week. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

The CDC says that when it comes to cloth masks, multiple layers made of higher thread counts do a better job of protecting the wearer. Michael Stewart/GC Images hide caption

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Michael Stewart/GC Images

NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center in north Minneapolis started as part of a 14-city pilot program funded by President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty. It's the only one of those health and social services clinics still in business. Nina Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Nina Robinson for NPR

How A Minneapolis Clinic Is Narrowing Racial Gaps In Health

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Gen. Gustave Perna tells NPR that if a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December, "10 to 30 million doses of vaccine will be available that we can start distributing" in the United States. Chip Somodevilla/AP hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/AP

Operation Warp Speed's Logistics Chief Weighs In On Vaccine Progress

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Even before becoming president-elect, Joe Biden has been working on a coordinated, national plan for fighting the coronavirus. Among other things, it will empower scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help set national, evidence-based guidance to stop outbreaks. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President-Elect Biden Has A Plan To Combat COVID-19. Here's What's In It

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Medical staff members treat a patient with COVID-19 last week in the intensive care unit of United Memorial Medical Center in Houston. Once a COVID-19 vaccine is available, experts say immunizing health workers first is the best way to curb deaths and stop transmission. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

First COVID-19 Vaccine Doses To Go To Health Workers, Say CDC Advisers

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Health care professionals gather outside Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis in June to demonstrate in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Rural communities across the country, places largely spared during the early days of the pandemic, are now seeing spikes in infections and hospitalizations. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 Surges In Rural Communities, Overwhelming Some Local Hospitals

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Shots - Health News

Shots

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